Saturday, May 30, 2015

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Hack a Banana Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Hey guys. It's funny, someone just mentioned MacGyver, because that was, like, I loved it, and when I was seven, I taped a fork to a drill and I was like, "Hey, Mom, I'm going to Olive Garden." And -- and it worked really well there. And you know, it had a profound effect on me. It sounds silly, but I thought, okay, the way the world works can be changed, and it can be changed by me in these small ways. And my relationship to especially human-made objects which someone else said they work like this, well, I can say they work a different way, a little bit.
2
And so, about 20 years later, I didn't realize the full effect of this, but I went to Costa Rica and I stayed with these Guaymí natives there, and they could pull leaves off of trees and make shingles out of them, and they could make beds out of trees, and they could -- I watched this woman for three days. I was there. She was peeling this palm frond apart, these little threads off of it, and she'd roll the threads together and make little thicker threads, like strings, and she would weave the strings together, and as the materiality of this exact very bag formed before my eyes over those three days, the materiality of the way the world works, of reality, kind of started to unravel in my mind, because I realized that this bag and these clothes and the trampoline you have at home and the pencil sharpener, everything you have is made out of either a tree or a rock or something we dug out of the ground and did some process to, maybe a more complicated one, but still, everything was made that way.
3
And so I had to start studying, who is it that's making these decisions? Who's making these things? How did they make them? What stops us from making them? Because this is how reality is created. So I started right away. I was at MIT Media Lab, and I was studying the maker movement and makers and creativity. And I started in nature, because I saw these Guaymís doing it in nature, and there just seems to be less barriers.
4
So I went to Vermont to Not Back to School Camp, where there's unschoolers who are just kind of hanging out and willing to try anything. So I said, "Let's go into the woods near this stream and just put stuff together, you know, make something, I don't care, geometrical shapes, just grab some junk from around you. We won't bring anything with us. And, like, within minutes, this is very easy for adults and teens to do. Here's a triangle that was being formed underneath a flowing stream, and the shape of an oak leaf being made by other small oak leaves being put together. A leaf tied to a stick with a blade of grass. The materiality and fleshiness and meat of the mushroom being explored by how it can hold up different objects being stuck into it. And after about 45 minutes, you get really intricate projects like leaves sorted by hue, so you get a color fade and put in a circle like a wreath.
5
And I'm like, "Wow, that's really amazing. He doesn't know, but he can show you." So his hands know and his intuition knows, but sometimes what we know gets in the way of what could be, especially when it comes to the human-made, human-built world. We think we already know how something works, so we can't imagine how it could work. We know how it's supposed to work, so we can't suppose all the things that could be possible.
6
So kids don't have as hard of a time with this, and I saw in my own son, I gave him this book. I'm a good hippie dad, so I'm like, "Okay, you're going to learn to love the moon. I'm going to give you some building blocks and they're nonrectilinear cactus building blocks, so it's totally legit." But he doesn't really know what to do with these. I didn't show him. And so he's like, "Okay, I'll just mess around with this." This is no different than the sticks are to the teens in the forest. Just going to try to put them in shapes and push on them and stuff. And before long, he's kind of got this mechanism where you can almost launch and catapult objects around, and he enlists us in helping him.
7
And at this point, I'm starting to wonder, what kind of tools can we give people, especially adults, who know too much, so that they can see the world as malleable, so they see themselves as agents of change in their everyday lives. Because the most advanced scientists are really just kind of pushing the way the world itself works, pushing what matter can do, the most advanced artists are just pushing the medium, and any sufficiently complicated task, whether you're a cook or a carpenter or you're raising a child -- anything that's complicated -- comes up with problems that aren't solved in the middle of it, and you can't do a good job getting it done unless you can say, "Okay, well we're just going to have to refigure this. I don't care that pencils are supposed to be for writing. I'm going to use them a different way."
Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what do you think the author did with his fork taped to a drill? 
  2. According to paragraph 2, what is ‘everything we have’ made out of?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what ‘intricate projects’ did the unschoolers make?  What do you think the author means by the word ‘unschoolers’ ?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what did the author give to his son to ‘mess around with’ ?  Why do you think he did this?
  5. According to paragraph 7, do you think that students in this school see the world as malleable? Malleable means changeable, so if you said yes or no, explain why you think this.  Give me an example from your own life, if you can.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is malleable .  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner


  1. Ask your partner how they answered question 5.  Did you agree with them with your own answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 5?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

Friday, May 1, 2015

Bill Gates – Epidemics CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}



1
When I was a kid, the disaster we worried about most was a nuclear war. That's why we had a barrel like this down in our basement, filled with cans of food and water. When the nuclear attack came, we were supposed to go downstairs, hunker down, and eat out of that barrel.
2
Today the greatest risk of global catastrophe doesn't look like this. Instead, it looks like this. If anything kills over 10 million people in the next few decades, it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war. Not missiles, but microbes. Now, part of the reason for this is that we've invested a huge amount in nuclear deterrents. But we've actually invested very little in a system to stop an epidemic. We're not ready for the next epidemic.
3
Let's look at Ebola. I'm sure all of you read about it in the newspaper, lots of tough challenges. I followed it carefully through the case analysis tools we use to track polio eradication. And as you look at what went on, the problem wasn't that there was a system that didn't work well enough, the problem was that we didn't have a system at all. In fact, there's some pretty obvious key missing pieces.
4
We didn't have a group of epidemiologists ready to go, who would have gone, seen what the disease was, seen how far it had spread. The case reports came in on paper. It was very delayed before they were put online and they were extremely inaccurate. We didn't have a medical team ready to go. We didn't have a way of preparing people. Now, Médecins Sans Frontières did a great job orchestrating volunteers. But even so, we were far slower than we should have been getting the thousands of workers into these countries. And a large epidemic would require us to have hundreds of thousands of workers. There was no one there to look at treatment approaches. No one to look at the diagnostics. No one to figure out what tools should be used. As an example, we could have taken the blood of survivors, processed it, and put that plasma back in people to protect them. But that was never tried.
5
So there was a lot that was missing. And these things are really a global failure. The WHO is funded to monitor epidemics, but not to do these things I talked about. Now, in the movies it's quite different. There's a group of handsome epidemiologists ready to go, they move in, they save the day, but that's just pure Hollywood.
6
The failure to prepare could allow the next epidemic to be dramatically more devastating than Ebola Let's look at the progression of Ebola over this year. About 10,000 people died, and nearly all were in the three West African countries. There's three reasons why it didn't spread more. The first is that there was a lot of heroic work by the health workers. They found the people and they prevented more infections. The second is the nature of the virus. Ebola does not spread through the air. And by the time you're contagious, most people are so sick that they're bedridden. Third, it didn't get into many urban areas. And that was just luck. If it had gotten into a lot more urban areas, the case numbers would have been much larger.
7
So next time, we might not be so lucky. You can have a virus where people feel well enough while they're infectious that they get on a plane or they go to a market. The source of the virus could be a natural epidemic like Ebola, or it could be bioterrorism. So there are things that would literally make things a thousand times worse.
8
In fact, let's look at a model of a virus spread through the air, like the Spanish Flu back in 1918. So here's what would happen: It would spread throughout the world very, very quickly. And you can see over 30 million people died from that epidemic. So this is a serious problem. We should be concerned.
9
But in fact, we can build a really good response system. We have the benefits of all the science and technology that we talk about here. We've got cell phones to get information from the public and get information out to them. We have satellite maps where we can see where people are and where they're moving. We have advances in biology that should dramatically change the turnaround time to look at a pathogen and be able to make drugs and vaccines that fit for that pathogen. So we can have tools, but those tools need to be put into an overall global health system. And we need preparedness.
10
The best lessons, I think, on how to get prepared are again, what we do for war. For soldiers, we have full-time, waiting to go. We have reserves that can scale us up to large numbers. NATO has a mobile unit that can deploy very rapidly. NATO does a lot of war games to check, are people well trained? Do they understand about fuel and logistics and the same radio frequencies? So they are absolutely ready to go. So those are the kinds of things we need to deal with an epidemic.
Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what disaster did the speaker worry about when he was a child?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what is likely to be the cause of the next global catastrophe?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what could they have done with the blood of survivors, if they had enough epidemiologists?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what was one of the reasons Ebola “did not spread more”?
  5. According to paragraph 7, the speaker says “Next time, we might not be so lucky.”  Do you agree with this statement?  Why?  Does this statement scare you?  Why?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is diagnostics .  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner
  1. Ask your partner how they answered question 5.  Did you agree with them with your own answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 5?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.


Sunday, April 19, 2015

How I Use Sonar to Navigate the World CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

https://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_kish_how_i_use_sonar_to_navigate_the_world?language=en



1
I was born with bilateral retinoblastoma, retinal cancer. My right eye was removed at seven months of age. I was 13 months when they removed my left eye. The first thing I did upon awakening from that last surgery was to climb out of my crib and begin wandering around the intensive care nursery, probably looking for the one who did this to me.  Evidently, wandering around the nursery was not a problem for me without eyes. The problem was getting caught.
2
It's impressions about blindness that are far more threatening to blind people than the blindness itself. Think for a moment about your own impressions of blindness. Think about your reactions when I first came onto the stage, or the prospect of your own blindness, or a loved one going blind. The terror is incomprehensible to most of us, because blindness is thought to epitomize ignorance and unawareness, hapless exposure to the ravages of the dark unknown. How poetic.
3
Fortunately for me, my parents were not poetic. They were pragmatic. They understood that ignorance and fear were but matters of the mind, and the mind is adaptable. They believed that I should grow up to enjoy the same freedoms and responsibilities as everyone else. In their own words, I would move out -- which I did when I was 18 -- I will pay taxes  and they knew the difference between love and fear. Fear immobilizes us in the face of challenge. They knew that blindness would pose a significant challenge. I was not raised with fear. They put my freedom first before all else, because that is what love does.
4
Now, moving forward, how do I manage today? The world is a much larger nursery. Fortunately, I have my trusty long cane, longer than the canes used by most blind people. I call it my freedom staff. It will keep me, for example, from making an undignified departure from the stage. (Laughter) I do see that cliff edge. They warned us earlier that every imaginable mishap has occurred to speakers up here on the stage. I don't care to set a new precedent.
5
But beyond that, many of you may have heard me clicking as I came onto the stage  with my tongue. Those are flashes of sound that go out and reflect from surfaces all around me, just like a bat's sonar, and return to me with patterns, with pieces of information, much as light does for you. And my brain, thanks to my parents, has been activated to form images in my visual cortex, which we now call the imaging system, from those patterns of information, much as your brain does. I call this process flash sonar. It is how I have learned to see through my blindness, to navigate my journey through the dark unknowns of my own challenges, which has earned me the moniker "the remarkable Batman."
6
Now, Batman I will accept. Bats are cool. Batman is cool. But I was not raised to think of myself as in any way remarkable. I have always regarded myself much like anyone else who navigates the dark unknowns of their own challenges. Is that so remarkable? I do not use my eyes, I use my brain.
7
Now, someone, somewhere, must think that's remarkable, or I wouldn't be up here, but let's consider this for a moment. Everyone out there who faces or who has ever faced a challenge, raise your hands. Whoosh. Okay. Lots of hands going up, a moment, let me do a head count. This will take a while.  Okay, lots of hands in the air. Keep them up. I have an idea. Those of you who use your brains to navigate these challenges, put your hands down. Okay, anyone with your hands still up has challenges of your own.
8
So we all face challenges, and we all face the dark unknown, which is endemic to most challenges, which is what most of us fear, okay? But we all have brains that allow us, that activate to allow us to navigate the journey through these challenges. Okay? Case in point: I came up here and -- (Clicking) -- they wouldn't tell me where the lectern was. So you can't trust those TED folks. "Find it yourself," they said. So -- (Laughter) And the feedback for the P.A. system is no help at all.
9
So now I present to you a challenge. So if you'd all close your eyes for just a moment, okay? And you're going to learn a bit of flash sonar. I'm going to make a sound. I'm going to hold this panel in front of me, but I'm not going to move it. Just listen to the sound for a moment. Shhhhhhhhhh. Okay, nothing very interesting. Now, listen to what happens to
Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

1. According to paragraph 1, how did the speaker get “retinoblastoma” ? Born with it
2. According to paragraph 2, what does the speaker say blindness epitomizes to most people? Ignorance and unawareness
3. Do you agree with the author about what he explains to us in question #2? Yes or No
4. According to paragraph 3, what did the speaker’s parents understand? Freedom is love
5. After reading paragraph 5, why do you think the speaker  clicks while he is on stage?    To see
6. The transferable vocabulary word is sonar .  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner
7. Ask your partner how they answered question 5.  Did you agree with them with your own answer?
8. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 5?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.

9. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Think Your Email is Private? {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Twenty-five years ago, scientists at CERN created the World Wide Web. Since then, the Internet has transformed the way we communicate, the way we do business, and even the way we live. In many ways, the ideas that gave birth to Google, Facebook, Twitter, and so many others, have now really transformed our lives, and this has brought us many real benefits such as a more connected society. However, there are also some downsides to this. Today, the average person has an astounding amount of personal information online, and we add to this online information every single time we post on Facebook, each time we search on Google, and each time we send an email.
2
Now, many of us probably think, well, one email, there's nothing in there, right? But if you consider a year's worth of emails, or maybe even a lifetime of email, collectively, this tells a lot. It tells where we have been, who we have met, and in many ways, even what we're thinking about. And the more scary part about this is our data now lasts forever, so your data can and will outlive you. What has happened is that we've largely lost control over our data and also our privacy.
3
So this year, as the web turns 25, it's very important for us to take a moment and think about the implications of this. We have to really think. We've lost privacy, yes, but actually what we've also lost is the idea of privacy itself. If you think about it, most of us here today probably remember what life was like before the Internet, but today, there's a new generation that is being taught from a very young age to share everything online, and this is a generation that is not going to remember when data was private. So we keep going down this road, 20 years from now, the word 'privacy' is going to have a completely different meaning from what it means to you and I.
4
So, it's time for us to take a moment and think, is there anything we can do about this? And I believe there is. Let's take a look at one of the most widely used forms of communication in the world today: email. Before the invention of email, we largely communicated using letters, and the process was quite simple. You would first start by writing your message on a piece of paper, then you would place it into a sealed envelope, and from there, you would go ahead and send it after you put a stamp and address on it. Unfortunately, today, when we actually send an email, we're not sending a letter. What you are sending, in many ways, is actually a postcard, and it's a postcard in the sense that everybody that sees it from the time it leaves your computer to when it gets to the recipient can actually read the entire contents.
5
So, the solution to this has been known for some time, and there's many attempts to do it. The most basic solution is to use encryption, and the idea is quite simple. First, you encrypt the connection between your computer and the email server. Then, you also encrypt the data as it sits on the server itself. But there's a problem with this, and that is, the email servers also hold the encryption keys, so now you have a really big lock with a key placed right next to it. But not only that, any government could lawfully ask for and get the key to your data, and this is all without you being aware of it.
6
So the way we fix this problem is actually relatively easy, in principle: You give everybody their own keys, and then you make sure the server doesn't actually have the keys. This seems like common sense, right? So the question that comes up is, why hasn't this been done yet?
7
Well, if we really think about it, we see that the business model of the Internet today really isn't compatible with privacy. Just take a look at some of the biggest names on the web, and you see that advertising plays a huge role. In fact, this year alone, advertising is 137 billion dollars, and to optimize the ads that are shown to us, companies have to know everything about us. They need to know where we live, how old we are, what we like, what we don't like, and anything else they can get their hands on. And if you think about it, the best way to get this information is really just to invade our privacy. So these companies aren't going to give us our privacy. If we want to have privacy online, what we have to do is we've got to go out and get it ourselves.
8
For many years, when it came to email, the only solution was something known as PGP, which was quite complicated and only accessible to the tech-savvy. Here's a diagram that basically shows the process for encrypting and decrypting messages. So needless to say, this is not a solution for everybody, and this actually is part of the problem, because if you think about communication, by definition, it involves having someone to communicate with. So while PGP does a great job of what it's designed to do, for the people out there who can't understand how to use it, the option to communicate privately simply does not exist. And this is a problem that we need to solve. So if we want to have privacy online, the only way we can succeed is if we get the whole world on board, and this is only possible if we bring down the barrier to entry. I think this is actually the key challenge that lies in the tech community. What we really have to do is work and make privacy more accessible.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what do we add to every time we post on Facebook?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what lasts forever?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is the new generation being taught?
  4. According to paragraph 4, why is your email more like a postcard than a letter?
  5. According to paragraph 7 & 8, why do you think today’s Internet is not compatible with privacy?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is invention.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they have ever sent an email that they wanted to be absolutely private.  Did they think no one else could read it after they sent it?  Why? 
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

1.    Your emails information is not private.
2.    Theres a problem with trying to encrypt and decrypt your emails information.
3.    Your email – its more like a postcard than a letter.
4.    Your computers screen is pretty dirty.

5.    Marks computer is cleaner than yours.

From: http://www.ted.com/talks/andy_yen_think_your_email_s_private_think_again?language=en

Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1

1
In the summer of 2011, as a tourist, I visited the rainforests of Borneo for the very first time, and as you might imagine, it was the overwhelming sounds of the forest that struck me the most. There's this constant cacophony of noise. Some things actually do stick out. For example, this here is a big bird, a rhinoceros hornbill. This buzzing is a cicada. This is a family of gibbons. It's actually singing to each other over a great distance.
2
The place where this was recorded was in fact a gibbon reserve, which is why you can hear so many of them, but in fact the most important noise that was coming out of the forest that time was one that I didn't notice, and in fact nobody there had actually noticed it. So, as I said, this was a gibbon reserve. They spend most of their time rehabilitating gibbons, but they also have to spend a lot of their time protecting their area from illegal logging that takes place on the side. And so if we take the sound of the forest and we actually turn down the gibbons, the insects, and the rest, in the background, the entire time, in recordings you heard, was the sound of a chainsaw at great distance. They had three full-time guards who were posted around this sanctuary whose job was in fact to guard against illegal logging, and one day, we went walking, again as tourists, out into the forest, and within five minutes' walk, we stumbled upon somebody who was just sawing a tree down, five minutes' walk, a few hundred meters from the ranger station. They hadn't been able to hear the chainsaws, because as you heard, the forest is very, very loud.
3
It struck me as quite unacceptable that in this modern time, just a few hundred meters away from a ranger station in a sanctuary, that in fact nobody could hear it when someone who has a chainsaw gets fired up. It sounds impossible, but in fact, it was quite true.  So how do we stop illegal logging? It's really tempting, as an engineer, always to come up with a high-tech, super-crazy high-tech solution, but in fact, you're in the rainforest. It has to be simple, it has to be scalable, and so what we also noticed while we were  there was that everything we needed was already there. We could build a system that would allow us to stop this using what's already there.
4
Who was there? What was already in the forest? Well, we had people. We had this group there that was dedicated, three full-time guards, that was dedicated to go and stop it, but they just needed to know what was happening out in the forest. The real surprise, this is the big one, was that there was connectivity out in the forest. There was cell phone service way out in the middle of nowhere. We're talking hundreds of kilometers from the nearest road, there's certainly no electricity, but they had very good cell phone service, these people in the towns were on Facebook all the time, they're surfing the web on their phones, and this sort of got me thinking that in fact it would be possible to use the sounds of the forest, pick up the sounds of chainsaws programmatically, because people can't hear them, and send an alert. But you have to have a device to go up in the trees. So if we can use some device to listen to the sounds of the forest, connect to the cell phone network that's there, and send an alert to people on the ground, perhaps we could have a solution to this issue for them.
5
But let's take a moment to talk about saving the rainforest, because it's something that we've definitely all heard about forever. People in my generation have heard about saving the rainforest since we were kids, and it seems that the message has never changed: We've got to save the rainforest, it's super urgent, this many football fields have been destroyed yesterday. and yet here we are today, about half of the rainforest remains, and we have potentially more urgent problems like climate change.
6
But in fact, this is the little-known fact that I didn't realize at the time: Deforestation accounts for more greenhouse gas than all of the world's planes, trains, cars, trucks and ships combined. It's the second highest contributor to climate change. Also, according to Interpol, as much as 90 percent of the logging that takes place in the rainforest is illegal logging, like the illegal logging that we saw. So if we can help people in the forest enforce the rules that are there, then in fact we could eat heavily into this 17 percent and potentially have a major impact in the short term. It might just be the cheapest, fastest way to fight climate change.
7
And so here's the system that we imagine. It looks super high tech. The moment a sound of a chainsaw is heard in the forest, the device picks up the sound of the chainsaw, it sends an alert through the standard GSM network that's already there to a ranger in the field who can in fact show up in real time and stop the logging. It's no more about going out and finding a tree that's been cut. It's not about seeing a tree from a satellite in an area that's been clear cut, it's about real-time intervention.
7
So I said it was the cheapest and fastest way to do it, but in fact, actually, as you saw, they weren't able to do it, so it may not be so cheap and fast. But if the devices in the trees were actually cell phones, it could be pretty cheap. Cell phones are thrown away by the hundreds of millions every year, hundreds of millions in the U.S. alone, not counting the rest of the world, which of course we should do, but in fact, cell phones are great. They're full of sensors. They can listen to the sounds of the forest. We do have to protect them. We have to put them in this box that you see here, and we do have to power them. Powering them is one of the greater engineering challenges that we had to deal with, because powering a cell phone under a tree canopy, any sort of solar power under a tree canopy, was an as-yet-unsolved problem, and that's this unique solar panel design that you see here, which in fact is built also from recycled byproducts of an industrial process

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what was overwhelming for the author?
  2. According to paragraph 2, how many guards protected the sanctuary?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is the author’s profession? What does this make him want to do?  Cite the line which supports this.
  4. According to paragraph 4, what did the author find surprising about the rain forest?
  5. According to paragraph 6, what do you think deforestation is, and explain what it is doing to the earth.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is intervention.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they think real-time intervention is a better method of catching illegal loggers.  Why?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. The authors idea came to him when he visited the rain forest for the first time.
  2. The rain forests problem is illegal loggers.
  3. The sanctuarys protections was just three guards.
  4. I wonder where the mens room is, in the rain forest.
From: http://www.ted.com/talks/topher_white_what_can_save_the_rainforest_your_used_cell_phone?language=en

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Stop Hating Yourself {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
We're all prone to a little self-loathing now and again, and sometimes that's a dark road that can only get worse. Thankfully, it's not too difficult to fight back if you can get yourself in the right mindsetConfidence is important, but sometimes it's easier to wallow in a pool of self-doubt so deep that being confident seems like a far off goal. Hating yourself is a different game where you're so obsessed with your failings that you refuse to accept the good. You're sitting in front of an audience applauding you, but it's not like you're saving the world. You've got the perfect job at the perfect company, but you're not managing the people you want to. You finished a 10K, but can't complete a marathon. It can go on and on. No matter how much you accomplish, you still hate yourself. Let's fix that.
2
Oftentimes, these moments of self-hatred are fleeting, spurned by a rough day at the office or a particularly nasty breakup. In those types of cases, you can approach it like you would any other mental hiccup: find a quick solution. Using an example culled from Anneli Rufus' book Unworthy, Psych Central suggests finding the place where you hate yourself less:
3
For starters, Rufus found a place where she hated herself less: by the seashore … a wild, rolling, splashing sea. "The sea expects nothing from me," she explains. "I cannot disappoint the sea. It does not care. It does not hate me, does not love me, does not wonder who I am or what I wear, because it does not care whether I am or am not there. The sea roars, either way."
Your place could be anywhere. It might be the local coffee shop, the hackerspace in your city, a particular park, or whatever. The point is to find that place where you can go where you're reminded that the world's a lot bigger than just you. If you're anything like me, it means getting as far away from your work or house as possible. I've taken to a weird spot on the beach along the bike path where few people tend to hang out. It's quiet, remote, and a great place to reset everything stupid in my head.
4
Identify Your Niche. Similarly, find your own niche in the world. Once you identify the traits that make you awesome, it's a lot easier to concentrate on them and feel better about yourself. Instead of feeling bad about what you can't do, you can think about all the things you can.
5
There's a mind trap that easy to fall into when you hate yourself, where your accomplishments don't feel like much. Chances are, that's at least partially because you're concentrating on the wrong things. I may not be a the greatest at small talk, but that doesn't mean I suck at conversation. It's easier to beat yourself up for what you can't do instead of figuring out what you're best at.
6
Finding your niche works on a lot of levels too. Your niche might be a character trait (you're kind, you're a good problem solver, whatever) or it might be a skillset. It doesn't really matter what it is, what's important is to find a focus on your strengths instead of your weaknesses.  You have a lot of tools to really figure out what you're best at. The most obvious is to simply write out a list of your traits, but if you're not sure what your niche is, it's time to think more like an explorer. Try new things, find that one thing that you're better at than most people, and run with it. It's amazing what having "one good thing" can do your overall self-respect.


One of the problems with self-loathing often stems from an overabundance of humility. On its own, humility isn't a bad trait to have. Taken too far it becomes a hindrance that prevents you from acknowledging your accomplishments and accepting compliments.

The trick is to make some attempts to get to know yourself better. A self-loather doesn't see themselves as other people see them. In turn, it's easy to disregard someone's compliment because it doesn't feel genuine.   But there is no right or wrong way to see yourself, no Archimedean point of reference around which others' perceptions must rotate. Another person's assessment of you is just as valid as yours—and possibly more so with respect to how you relate to other people, whether these relationships are familial, friendly, or romantic. In simple terms, people who think of themselves as nice may come off as obnoxious jerks to others, and people who think they have nothing to offer other people may be seen by others as very interesting. The point is that you don't know as much about yourself as you think...
This is one of those cognitive truths that's hard to correct for. If you're a self-loather, that feeling of inadequacy is around no matter what you do. The trick, according to Psychology Today, is to do your best to remember that your self-perception isn't complete, nor is it any more "right" than someone elses. You can learn a lot from how other people see you, but you'll need to accept what you learn and try to integrate that into your own views.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?
  1. Self
  2. Loathing
  3. Mindset
Adjective
Noun
Noun

About myself
Not liking
Our state of mind.  What we are thinking about


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what might self-loathing people be obsessed about?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what might cause these moments of ‘self-hatred’?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what should you identify?  What does this mean?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what should you focus on?
  5. The transferable vocabulary word is solution.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner (or do by yourself today).

  1. What do you think your niche might be?  What accomplishments do you have in this area, even if they are super small in your mind, they are important!
  2. Has there ever been a time when you doubted your ability to do something like schoolwork or playing a sport? Just answer yes or no.  After reading this article, do you think you were too hard on yourself?  Why do you think you were?
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. Marks abilities were awesome.
  2. Stevens mindset is full of self-loathing.
  3. Tonys phone does not have any apps.
  4. The mens version of the iPhone is in a leather case.
  5. Kevins phone is the iPhone Plus. Its screen is large.
Article from http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2015/02/how-to-stop-hating-yourself-and-start-down-the-path-to-self-respect/

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Trusting Strangers {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

We Trust Strangers, Even When It Doesn’t Make Sense to Do So
By Alice Park

1
There’s a reason why those bank scams on the internet continue to flourish. Because we feel guilty if we don’t trust people.Relationships, businesses, governments—almost every interaction people have is built on trust. eBay can’t survive without it. But why do we put so much faith in others? What makes us so sure that the person who puts a mint condition baby carriage up for sale a) Actually owns the carriage, b) Isn’t lying when he says it’s in mint condition, and c) will send the said carriage when you pay him?
2
David Dunning, a psychology professor at Cornell University and his colleagues, say that all rational behavior theories predict that people shouldn’t trust complete strangers. We have no way of knowing that the other person will do what he promises in any transaction, because we know nothing about that person. Any rational model of behavior predicts that the other person will renege on any promise as soon as it’s in his best interest to do so. Survival of the fittest and all.
3
But in a series of trust experiments with 645 undergraduates, the scientists found that 62% would give away a small sum of money even if their two options were that the other person would keep it all, or, if the person decided to return it, that both would get back a larger amount. If the students were actually calculating the odds of getting their money back or increasing it, only 20% would have taken the gamble.
4
What does that tell us about ourselves? That we’re more of a society than we thought. Most of the participants talked about politeness and rudeness as motivating them to trust their fellow study subject, even if it meant potentially getting exploited by them. “Their behavior was a comment on the other person’s character,” says Dunning. By not giving up the money, in other words, the volunteers were concerned that they would be implying that the other subject was untrustworthy and a crook, because by keeping the money, they had decided it wasn’t going to be returned. “People feel a social duty to respect the other person,” says Dunning.
5
How does he know that the first person wasn’t simply acting out of greed over potentially quadrupling their payoff? Through other variations of this game, in which participants chose between trusting a stranger to return the money or a coin flip that would decide, people did not take such gambles on getting their money back if they were told the coin flip would determine whether they got their money back. “That tells us that people are responding to issues in the other person’s character,” says Dunning. “The signal they are sending is that ‘I respect your character.’ As soon as you take out that issue, people gamble at the rate that would be consistent with greed.”
6
You can interpret that as either being a sign of solidarity, an inexplicable sense of belonging to and being a member of a community in which everyone treats everyone with respect, or you can view it in a slightly more cynical way – that people trust others because they think they have to, and are guilted into acting in the more magnanimous way. Different people may justify their behavior in different ways, says Dunning. That’s because although most people will act in the more generous, way that shows respect and trust for their fellow man, that doesn’t mean that they believe internally that everyone is trustworthy. “The situation causes internal conflict,” he says. “We get 30% to 40% of people saying something like the odds are that I am going to get screwed, or not get the money back, but they still give up the $5 to the other person.”
7
That strength of community norms, or an obligation to act in ways that may be counter to their internal beliefs, is something that Dunning hopes to explore further. Does it come from an even deeper faith in the goodness of the world and an optimism that people are good and nice to each other? Perhaps. For now, it’s enough to know that even strangers tend to trust one another – even if it’s driven by a sense of obligation.


Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. bank
  2. scam
  3. flourish
Adj
Noun
verb

Modifies a noun
Idea
Shows action


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, why do bank scams on the internet flourish?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why shouldn’t people trust strangers?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what motivated the participants into trusting strangers? (2 things)
  4. According to paragraph 6, what is solidarity?
  5. According to paragraph 7, how does the article explain why people trust strangers?  (1 word)
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is optimism.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they would give $20.00 to a complete stranger if the stranger promised to return it to them tomorrow.  Why did they chose this answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. The strangers request was strange.
  2. The schools schedule for Tuesday is for the juniors only.
  3. The supporters votes will help elect Garcia as our new mayor.
  4. Todays lesson was about trusting strangers.
  5. The articles main idea involved the reasons people trust complete strangers.





http://time.com/103396/we-trust-strangers-even-when-it-doesnt-make-sense-to-do-so/

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Chicago Election {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Re-election battles typically are referendums on the incumbent, one reason Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia framed his Chicago mayoral candidacy as a reaction to perceived shortcomings in the style and performance of Rahm Emanuel.
2
"The mayor's decision to close 50 schools and drive teachers out on strike for the first time in 25 years was the defining moment for his administration," said Garcia, who is backed by the Chicago Teachers Union. "Mayor Emanuel likes to say he makes hard choices, but there is a difference between making hard choices and being hardheaded."
3
In forcing a runoff election with Emanuel, Garcia will almost certainly gain the campaign trail star power and political cash that seemed to elude him in the run-up to Tuesday's vote.  And that in itself is somewhat remarkable in an era when politics is increasingly defined by made-for-TV bombast and artful spin — things not naturally in Garcia's skill set.
4
"He's an odd bird in the sense that he's got two traits you rarely find in politicians these days, which are honesty and humility," said Maurice Sone, an attorney who oversees a Little Village community group that Garcia led years ago. "Don't let his soft demeanor surprise you. ... He's not confrontational. He just has a different way."
5
Garcia is something of an accidental candidate in the mayor's race, the third choice of progressive liberals who formed the core of his support base. Initially they hoped to coalesce around Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, but when she opted not to challenge Emanuel they threw their support behind Karen Lewis, the charismatic Chicago Teachers Union president.  Then Lewis took ill and recruited the 58-year-old Garcia to do battle with the mayor.
6
Born in Mexico but raised in Chicago's Little Village, Garcia has been involved in activist causes for most of his adult life. He was an early supporter of the late Mayor Harold Washington, and he won an aldermanic election in 1986 that proved crucial in helping the city's first black mayor secure control of the council from a bloc of white alderman that routinely obstructed his policies.
7
Later he served two terms in the state Senate before being targeted for ouster by a Hispanic political group allied with former Mayor Richard M. Daley. Garcia returned to public office in 2010 as a member of the County Board, where he now serves as Preckwinkle's floor leader. In the interim, he ran a Little Village-area community group active in pushing for voting rights, economic development issues, legal safeguards for immigrants without legal residency, violence prevention and other issues of concern to Latinos.
8
The group, now known as Enlace Chicago, drew headlines in 2001 as it led a nearly three-week hunger strike by parents who pressured city school officials into fulfilling a long-delayed promise to build a new high school in Little Village.
On Tuesday night, addressing a crowd of enthusiastic supporters, Garcia served notice that he planned to fashion his campaign over the next six weeks with the same sort of populist fervor that propelled Harold Washington into office three decades ago.
9
"Nobody thought we'd be here tonight," Garcia declared to cheers. "They wrote us off, they said we didn't have a chance. They said we didn't have any money, while they spent millions attacking us. Well, we're still standing. We're still running. And we're gonna win."



Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Re-election
  2. Battles
  3. referendums
Adj
Noun
Noun

Modifies a noun
Idea
Idea


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, who is the incumbent that is running for mayor?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what decision did the mayor make which Jesus Garcia thinks was a big mistake?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is Garcia now going to gain?  Why?  What has changed?
  4. According to paragraph 5, Garcia is an ‘accidental candidate’.  What do you think this means?  Can you cite a line which supports your idea?  Then do it!
  5. According to paragraph 8, what has the group Enlace done in the past to help communities?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is incumbent.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree with Garcia when he stated that closing 50 schools was a huge mistake for the current mayor.  Ask them for 2 reasons why they think this.  Write this information down!
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. Jesus Garcias campaign will now receive more money because of the run-off election.
  2. Garcia was raised in Chicagos Little Village.
  3. The supporters votes will help elect Garcia as our new mayor.
  4. Todays lesson was about the mayoral election.
  5. The articles main idea involved the idea that Jesus Garcia is now in a run-off election with Rahm Emanuel.