Saturday, December 20, 2014

Walking and Texting : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

WASHINGTON — Distracted walkers are walking in front of cars and into trees. Staring down at cellphones, they fall off curbs and bridges, and even walk into wet cement. They have gotten cuts and bruises and head injuries. Some have even been killed. Many cities and states are designing and promoting walkable neighborhoods, partly to attract more young people. At the same time, some are also giving tickets to distracted walkers and lowering speed limits to make streets safer for pedestrians.
2
Pedestrian injuries caused by cellphone use are up 35 percent since 2010, according to numbers from hospital emergency rooms. Every year, thousands of pedestrians are injured as they walk in cities. Some researchers say 1 out of 10 of those injuries are caused by a distracting mobile device such as a phone or portable music player. Utah and New Jersey have given tickets to people who text in dangerous walking situations. New York City now has lower speed limits, in part to make traffic less dangerous for distracted walkers.
3
“We have to design streets for the way people actually behave, and behavior is changing,” said Noah Budnick of NYC-based Transportation Alternatives. “If you’re looking at a phone when you’re walking around, that shouldn’t mean death. So we have to design forgiving streets.” New York City’s new speed limits are 20 miles per hour (mph) in Central Park and 25 mph in the rest of the city unless otherwise posted. The city has also been blocking off more streets to make safer pedestrian plazas where cars are not allowed.
4
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx has given $1.6 million to Louisville, Kentucky; New York City and Philadelphia for walker-safety programs. “We’ve got to encourage people to have an awareness that this problem is a real problem,” Foxx said. In 2012, 78,000 pedestrians were injured. It is the highest number since 2001, according to the National Highway Traffic Administration. Also in 2012, 4,700 walkers were killed. That number has been increasing since 2009. It fell for several years before that. Some areas are focusing on stopping people who use cellphones while walking. Distracted walkers in Utah can get a $50 fine. In New Jersey, police gave tickets to people using phones while walking into traffic.
5
Philadelphia took a different approach. They made a joke of it. On April Fools’ Day 2012, the city painted “e-lanes” on sidewalks. These lanes were reserved for people staring at their phones. “We know that many, many people are using the sidewalks, looking at their iPhones, BlackBerrys, other electronic devices and they’re quite distracted by those devices, bumping into people,” Mayor Michael Nutter said in a video, as a distracted walker bumped into him.
6
Minnesota, Utah, North Carolina, South Carolina and Washington state have also begun pedestrian safety programs to reduce traffic deaths. San Francisco has pledged to spend $50 million on its Walk First program. The city will examine “high injury corridors” to determine why those areas are so dangerous. The plan also suggests raised crosswalks and traffic islands for pedestrians.  Distracted driving is also causing more pedestrian deaths, researchers say. A driver and a walker each staring at their cellphone is a dangerous combination. In a survey last year by ;Liberty Mutual Insurance, half of pedestrians admitted to talking on the phone while walking across the street. One out of 4 said they text or email while crossing the street, even though they realize it is dangerous.
7
University of Buffalo researcher Dr. Dietrich Jehle estimates that 1 in 10 pedestrian injuries is now related to distracted walking. He believes distracted walking causes more accidents than distracted driving. Jehle studied the issue while working as an emergency room doctor. Texting is the most dangerous thing to do while walking, he said — more dangerous than listening to music or talking on the phone. A 2011 study found that texting makes walking extremely difficult. People in walking simulations had a 61 percent error rate while texting.

“While talking on the phone is a distraction, texting is much more dangerous because you can’t see the path in front of you,” Jehle said.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Distracted
  2. Walkers

Adjective
Noun
Modifies a Noun
Person

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what are distracted walkers doing?
  2. According to paragraph 2, are injuries caused by cellphones up?  Cite the line which supports this.
  3. According to paragraph 3, What is New York City doing to make streets safer for pedestrians?
  4. According to paragraph 4, what can happened to a distracted walker in Utah?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is designing.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree with what is says in paragraph 4 about fining distracted walkers in Utah.
  2. Do you see anything negative about being a distracted walker?  List them.  You can use ideas from this article.
  3. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.

Use the outline on the board for #9


Article From:


https://newsela.com/articles/distracted-walkers/id/6440/

Thursday, December 18, 2014

The Interview : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}


Many movies have faced protests and pickets over the years, yet the new Seth Rogen-James Franco comedy “The Interview” was deemed to be so potentially dangerous that Sony Pictures Entertainment canceled its wide Christmas Day release Wednesday after the nation's top theatrical chains announced they wouldn't play it.
2
Sony's decision — one causing much hand-wringing inside and outside Hollywood over the possible precedents being set — followed a threat against theaters from an anonymous group that began reaping corporate destruction in late November by releasing Sony executives' hacked emails in apparent retaliation for the movie. “The Interview” imagines Franco and Rogen as a talk show host and producer who get entangled in a plot to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The cancellation of a widely promoted Hollywood holiday season release in response to an anonymous threat set off alarm bells among those inside and outside the creative community.
3
“Do we stop releasing every movie that people anonymously say not to release?” filmmaker Judd Apatow, who launched Franco's and Rogen's careers on his 1999-2000 TV series “Freaks and Geeks” and directed the Rogen-starring "Knocked Up," told the Tribune from his Los Angeles office. “Tomorrow it could be ‘Don't release Pepsi.' It could happen to every business. It's not even a show business question.”  “It's a very scary and sad moment, not just for the movie world but for the way we live in general,” filmmaker and former Chicagoan Adam McKay (“Anchorman”) said via email. “The idea that people gathering in a theater to laugh can be perceived as dangerous, even for a few days, is just unacceptable.”
4
"The North Koreans are probably tickled pink," said Jim Lewis, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "Nobody has ever done anything this blatant in terms of political manipulation. This is a new high."  On Wednesday, U.S. intelligence officials confirmed widespread speculation that the North Korean government was linked to the attack. "With the Sony collapse, America has lost its first cyberwar. This is a very, very dangerous precedent," said former Republican House of Representatives speaker Newt Gingrich in a Twitter post.
5
However, Sony's shares closed 4.8 percent higher in Tokyo on Thursday, outperforming the 2.3 percent gain on the Nikkei index, as investors said there was hope the movie’s cancellation would help bring an end to the crisis. The group, calling itself Guardians of Peace, issued a warning Tuesday that referred to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and instructed people to stay away from theaters showing “The Interview.”
6
“We recommend you to keep yourself distant from the places at that time. (If your house is nearby, you'd better leave.)” the message read.  Alamo Drafthouse defiantly replaced "The Interview" with a Dec. 27 screening of the 2004 satire after "The Interview" was yanked from screens over a terrorist threat. However, Paramount Pictures, the studio behind "Team America," will not offer it for exhibition.  "We can confirm that the screening of 'Team America' was canceled as the film was pulled from release," Alamo Drafthouse said in a statement. "We are issuing refunds to those that purchased tickets."
7
It's a sign that Hollywood may be wary of further stirring up the politically charged situation surrounding "The Interview." Carmike Cinemas, the nation's fourth-largest theater chain, announced late Tuesday that it would not show the film, and the top three exhibitors — Regal, AMC and Cinemark — followed suit Wednesday.
8
Sony subsequently announced it was pulling the film, saying in a statement: “Those who attacked us stole our intellectual property, private emails and sensitive and proprietary material, and sought to destroy our spirit and our morale — all apparently to thwart the release of a movie they did not like. We are deeply saddened at this brazen effort to suppress the distribution of a movie, and in the process do damage to our company, our employees, and the American public. We stand by our filmmakers and their right to free expression and are extremely disappointed by this outcome.” A scheduled press/promotional screening Thursday night at the ShowPlace ICON Theatre off Roosevelt Road also was canceled.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Movies

noun

thing

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, why did Sony Pictures cancel “The Interview” movie?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why did the hacker group release Sony’s emails?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what does Judd Apatow say about cancelling the movie’s release?
  4. According to paragraph 4, who is linked to the attack?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is retaliation.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree with what is says in paragraph 8 about cancelling a movie because someone stole emails from Sony.
  2. Do you see anything dangerous about releasing the movie? Cite a line which supports this answer.
  3. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.


Use the outline on the board for #9


http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-sony-interview-north-korea-20141217-story.html#page=1

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Drones : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

HACKENSACK, N.J. — The hot Christmas present this year isn’t a doll, a toy or a video game. It’s a small flying aircraft with a camera attached — a drone. There’s the DJI Phantom 2 Vision, a drone which has four propellers and a high-definition camera. USA Today recently called this drone, which sells for $1,200, a top holiday gift for 2014. Then there’s the Parrot AR 2.0, selling for $395 on Amazon. Want to entertain the family for less than a hundred dollars? No problem. Radio Shack is selling the Surveyor Drone. It’s red, it shoots video, and it’s cheap — just $60 this holiday season.
2
Rob Powley of Mahwah, New Jersey, has so many drones that he forgets the exact number. He bought some preassembled and built others himself. “I bought them because they’re cool,” Powley said. “It’s amazing what you can do with a drone. And they’re getting better all the time.” For years, drones were mostly used by the military for top-secret missions and then for bombing and surveillance in Iraq and Afghanistan. Now, drones are available to the average consumer, offering low-cost fun and easy-to-use cameras. But more drones in the skies are also bringing problems for pilots, tourists in national parks and even pedestrians.
3
Drones are increasingly bringing up concerns over safety and privacy. There are calls for more regulation of drones by state governments and at the federal level. The fun gift you get under the tree this year may face many tight new regulations in the future. The laws covering drones vary by state, city and town, said Wells C. Bennett, who studies national security law at the Brookings Institution.  “It’s fluid, and it’s confusing,” Bennett said. “And a lot of the laws will change over the next couple of years.” Only five years ago, drones available to consumers simply didn’t exist, said Mike Blades, an aerospace-industry analyst for market-research firm Frost & Sullivan. Since then, sales of drones have exploded. Blades estimates consumers will spend $720 million on drones this year. Next year, that will double, which amounts to about 200,000 drones sold every month, he believes.
4
Drones are easier to fly than traditional radio-controlled planes and helicopters because they often have four rotors and advanced microchips to help stabilize flight. Drones also move differently — replacing an airplane's smooth dips and arcs with the sharp turns of a robot. Drones take off vertically, shooting straight up into the sky. With old-fashioned radio-controlled planes, you need a lot of space, Powley said. But a small quadcopter drone can be flown inside a house. In fact, Powley does fly his drones around his house and office. “You can fly with first-person video, so it looks like you’re inside it. That’s really cool,” Powley said.
5
Many military drones were designed for stealth, made to be as quiet as possible. There’s nothing sneaky about most drones for consumers, though. Drones’ propellers hum at different pitches, creating a racket like a hive of angry bees. If a drone runs out of batteries, it’s likely to fall out of the sky like a stone. Cheaper drones may fly for just a minute or two, while more expensive models may fly for around 12 minutes, drone users said.
6
The biggest difference between radio-controlled planes and drones is cameras. Today, small, light cameras such as GoPros can fly on drones and transmit photos and video instantly back to smartphones, tablets and computers. New technologies like LIDAR cameras use lasers to operate like radar and can make intricate 3-D models of land and territory from the sky. They can even spot people through trees, making them useful for military and police.
7
As these technologies get lighter and cheaper, “they will be affordable for anyone to buy in the next 10 years,” Blades said.  Lighter equipment and better batteries also mean that drones in the near future will fly higher, farther and faster than anything available for sale today. Concerns about privacy and the safety of consumer drones are growing, too. The National Park Service temporarily banned drones on all the land it manages after receiving complaints about drones at Mount Rushmore, the Grand Canyon and Yosemite. Since July, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which controls airports and aircraft in the U.S., has been receiving 30 complaints a month from pilots who have had close calls with drones or seen them flying in restricted airspace near airports. On Sept. 8, for example, the pilots of three different passenger jets reported “a very close call” with a drone at about 1,900 feet as they flew their final approaches into La Guardia Airport in New York City.

Even a small drone could bring down a jet.


Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. drone

noun

thing

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what does a drone have?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why did the military use drones?
  3. According to paragraph 3, if you bought a drone today, could the law change tomorrow and not let you use it? Cite a line which supports your answer.
  4. According to paragraph 4, how to drones take off?  Could this be dangerous for a child flying one?  Why?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is drone.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree with what is says in paragraph 7 about drones being dangerous.  Can they be?  Why?
  2. Do you see anything negative about having many drones flying in the air all around the city?
  3. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.


Use the outline on the board for #9

Article found at: https://newsela.com/articles/drone-popularity/id/6408/

Sunday, November 30, 2014

SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

The Nordstrom just off of North Michigan Avenue bore few signs Sunday of the fatal shooting that had taken place less than 48 hours earlier amid a crowd of holiday shoppers. The luxury department store reopened for the first time since police say 31-year-old Marcus Dee fatally shot his ex-girlfriend there Friday night before turning the gun on himself in what police described as a domestic-related shooting. It wasn't packed; it wasn't empty.

But a few small things stood out.  Employees exchanged hugs in the first-floor accessories department. A large bouquet of flowers was displayed near the escalators on the first floor with a hand-written note to the victim, employee Nadia Ezaldein, and her family saying, "We will miss her."

"We just decided yesterday that it felt OK to open today," Nordstrom spokeswoman Tara Darrow said Sunday morning. "Sometimes coming back to work and being surrounded by co-workers helps with processing things."  Darrow said the decision to close the store was meant to "give our employees time to regroup and support each other and just out of respect of our employee's family."

Ezaldein, 22, was pronounced dead Saturday afternoon after she had been put on life support. After an autopsy Sunday, the Cook County medical examiner's office said she died of a gunshot wound to the forearm and head. Ezaldein had been working at the store as a seasonal employee since Oct. 21, Darrow said.  Darrow said the store did not have an estimate on how much it cost to close Saturday — the day after Black Friday — adding that she didn't think the store "would provide something like that."

Sylvie Hau, 48, who was visiting Chicago for the weekend, said she was surprised the store was already open again and that she "felt funny" about going inside even though she shops at Nordstrom "all the time."  "I guess business must go on," Hau, of Connecticut, said on her way off of Michigan Avenue into the Shops at North Bridge mall, which houses the Nordstrom store at its west end.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. The
  2. Nordstrom
  3. bore
Article
Noun
Verb
Refers to a noun
Place or Thing
Shows Action

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to the article, when and where did the shooting happen?
  2. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  3. The transferable vocabulary word is displayed.  Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?
  4. According to the article, what was different when the store reopened?

Small Group

  1. Small Group Question:  Ask a neighbor if they believe a store should be opened 2 days after a person was shot there.  Write down their answer, and ask them why they chose that answer.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chi-chicago-nordstrom-shooting-murder-20141130-story.html

Friday, November 21, 2014

SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

Tiger in France

According to French authorities, a tiger is on the loose near Disneyland Paris. Please, if you're currently visiting the tourist destination, stay indoors and quit bragging about your fun vacation.  The AP reports that the town of Montevrain alerted its Facebook followers about the young tiger on Thursday, saying it was found by a resident about five-and-a-half miles from Disneyland Paris. Jean-Baptiste Berdeaux spoke to the French media about the moment his wife spotted the animal, saying, "She didn't get out of the car and called me to say, 'I think I saw a lynx.'"

Cedric Tartaud, chief of staff for the Montevrain mayor, said 60 police, firefighters, and security forces are currently trying to track the tiger.

Police were using a helicopter to help search for the animal, and a wolf-catcher was also drafted in to aid in the search, Seine-et-Marne authorities said.  Police and rescue squads at the scene have roped off a security perimeter, authorities added and urged people living in Montevrain, Chessy and Chalifert to remain indoors. If they had to travel, police advised them to stay in their cars.

A police source told Agence France-Presse, "We have been running after it since this morning. Police officers are trying to intercept it." According to Mirror, police have warned that the search may go into the night.
Where did the tiger come from, you're probably wondering? Well, there is a wild cat animal park about 18 miles from Montevrain, but the Parc des Felins reportedly released a statement on its website saying all of its cats were accounted for. Likewise, Euro Disney deflected blame with an airtight alibi: Disneyland Paris does not have any tigers, so probably this tiger is not their tiger.

So. Whose tiger is it? Is it your tiger? Man, you've got to be more careful with your tiger!

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. Authorities
  2. Visiting
4.    The
Noun
Verb
Article
Person
Shows Action
Refers to a noun

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. What would you do if you saw a tiger near a park you were playing at?  Why?
  2. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  3. The transferable vocabulary word is perimeter .  Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?
  4. In paragraph 3, what do you think the author means by the use of the word perimeter


SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

George R R Martin & Writing

In 1971, a young writer graduated with his Masters degree in Journalism from Northwestern University. He spent the first 13 years of his career writing professionally and made a living from it, but without major success. In 1983, he released his fourth book, The Armageddon Rag.
Nobody read it—the book was a total flop. In the author’s own words, “It essentially destroyed my career as a novelist at the time.”

But he was determined and so he found ways to keep writing. He landed a job writing a television script for CBS. Soon after, the show was cancelled. He managed to work his way onto another TV series, this time on ABC, but it was cancelled again. In 1991, after nearly a decade of bouncing around, he decided to start writing fiction again.
Two million words later, George R.R. Martin was famous.

Martin is the best-selling author of the fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire. The first book in the series, A Game of Thrones, has also been turned into a blockbuster television series on HBO. (The first season of the show was nominated for 13 Emmy awards.)  The epic 7-part series that hasn’t even been finished (Martin is currently working on the sixth book), but it has already sold more than 25 million copies. What is most surprising isn’t how good the books are, but how, exactly, Martin writes his best-selling works…

Focus, Consistency, and Patience

One of the greatest lessons I’ve learned from weightlifting is that there are 3 simple things that you need for success.  Focus: You can’t be good at everything and it’s hard to be great at more than one thing, so pick the one thing you’re going to become great at and focus on it.
Consistency: Focus is useless if you’re only focused every now and then. It’s showing up time after time that makes the difference.
Patience: If you’re focused and consistent, then let time work for you. Results will come when they come. Focus on the system, not the goal.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. 1971
  2. Writer
  3. Graduated
Noun
Noun
Verb
Idea
Person
Shows Action

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing


  1. According to the article, what are the three most important things for success?
  2. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  3. The transferable vocabulary word is journalism.  Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?
  4. According to the article, what do you think is the most important thing for success?

SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Four members of a family were out of the hospital Thursday morning after suffering severe carbon monoxide poisoning at a home in Roseland where the stove and oven were being used for heat, officials said.  "Everybody is home, everybody is doing well," a relative said. "It was very scary. . .I was just running from hospital to hospital to make sure everyone was alive." 

The levels of carbon monoxide in the home in the 300 block of West 107th Street were 1,000 parts per million, a "lethal" level, according to Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford.  "If we had found 50 parts per million we might evacuate. . .so 1,000, that is lethal," Langford said.

Paramedics were dispatched around 8 p.m. Wednesday after someone inside the home called 911, officials said. They found the four, all adults, unconscious on the living room floor, Langford said.  They included a 79-year-old man who lives in the home and three relatives who had just brought him home from the hospital after being treated for a fall, according to relatives and Fire Chief Tom Sutkus.  He gave their ages as 51, 47 and 23.

The four were taken in critical condition to three hospitals, Langford said. They were breathing but unconscious, he said.  They were all released from the hospitals overnight, relatives said.  Fire officials said they found the oven door open and all four stove burners on, heating pots of water as a make-shift humidifier, officials said.  The furnace was on but malfunctioning, which is why the stove and burners were probably on, Sutkus said.

"We highly recommend you don't do that," Sutkus told reporters at the scene. "If you have a problem with the furnace, please get the furnace checked. Get it serviced. Do not use your stove to heat the house. Do not use the burners. Do not use the oven."  The home did not have a carbon monoxide detector, which is required by city ordinance, officials said.  “I guess my grandfather was trying to fix things on his own, the furnace had been acting up for a while,’’ the relative said.  She said her grandfather returned to the home on 107th Street even though there is no heat.

"The house is cold. . .they busted out all the windows," she said. "He’s very upset by this."

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. Family
  2. The
  3. Hospital
Noun
Article
Noun
Person
Refers to a noun
Place or thing

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to the article, why is it important to not heat the house with the oven?
  2. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  3. The transferable vocabulary word is carbon monoxide.  Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?
  4. According to the article, why did they have water on the stove?


Tuesday, November 4, 2014

SUP 401 Locate important details in passages

Idiot To Be Released from Olive Garden Pasta Pass Prison

Alan Martin, a church minister and father of two, has sentenced himself to seven weeks in Never Ending Pasta Pass prison at Olive Garden. He invited the Fox affiliate in Burlington, NC to visit him as he slurps down another bowl of limp noodles swimming in room temperature pond water. It is the saddest two minutes I have ever watched.

Martin welcomes each successive plate of pasta, with a "Hello, friend," his face despondent as a waitresses grates a waterfall of cheese on top of his food.  He tells WGHP that the waitstaff at this Olive Garden treats him "like a celebrity."  An expert might diagnose Martin with Stockholm Syndrome. "I can't believe I get to eat like this every day!" Martin exclaims on camera, his eyes betraying the sentiment. "This is great..."

Martin, who apparently has no other outlet in life, bought the Pasta Pass for $100 in September, and has since eaten at Olive Garden twice a day—every day—for the past six weeks. Just one more to go!  So far, he's eaten 95 bowls of pasta. "He's gotten his money's worth, absolutely..." Burlington Olive Garden general manager Chris Lambert nervously tells WGHP.

Only 1,000 Never Ending Pasta Passes exist. Martin's story may be the most pathetic.  "I would love to be the person that's eaten the most out of the 1,000 people—you know, that'd be a good contest to win," Martin told the TV station.  "Why?" the WGHP reporter asks.

"Because that means I got the most value out of the card than anybody did in the United States," he responded. He figures he's saved more than $1,000. It is unclear how those savings in human money will help cover what Martin has lost in dignity.  You probably think I'm being too hard on 'ol Alan Martin. Go ahead and think that, friend. Because I will not stand for what must be a lie: "Believe it or not," WGHP reports, "he says he hasn't gained any weight."


Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. Alan Martin
  2. Minister
4.    Pasta
Noun
Noun
Noun
Person
Person
Thing

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. Do you think Alan Martin did too much when he ate almost 100 bowls of pasta in 6 weeks?  Why?
  2. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  3. The transferable vocabulary word is Diagnose.  Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?
  4. In paragraph 2, how do the workers at the restaurant treat Alan?  Cite a line which proves this point.
  5. In the last paragraph, is Alan proud of what he has done?  Cite a line which shows this.


http://gawker.com/idiot-to-be-released-from-olive-garden-pasta-pass-priso-1654443054

EPAS SUP 401 – Cragin Neighborhood

Glbert Sanchez said he remembers a time when he would stay up until 2 or 3 o'clock in the morning to work on his car outside of his home on Chicago's Northwest Side.  "It was no big deal," said Sanchez, who has lived in Cragin for about 28 years. "The neighborhood was so quiet."
Now Sanchez and other neighbors on his block are used to hearing gunshots in their area nearly every week, they said.  Early Sunday, Sanchez and three neighbors stood outside their homes on the corner of North Lockwood and West Oakdale avenues after hearing around 18 gunshots fired on their block.  The shooting, which happened around 12:35 a.m., left an 18-year-old woman dead in the 5300 block of West Oakdale Avenue, said Chicago Police Department News Affairs Officer Ron Gaines.

The victim was identified as Alexandria Burgos, of the 5200 block of North Nagle Avenue, according to the Cook County medical examiner's office.  It was the second shooting death within about a month in the area. Less than a mile southwest of the West Oakdale Avenue shooting, a 19-year-old man and a 17-year-old boy had exchanged gunfire in the 5000 block of West Wrightwood Avenue on Sept. 18, according to police.

In that incident, 19-year-old Justin Mercado suffered a single gunshot wound and was later pronounced dead at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, according to Cook County medical examiner's office. The 17-year-old was hospitalized after being hit several times in the legs, police said.  According to city crime statistics, there were 35 reports of violent crime in the area from Sept. 10 to Oct. 10. Over the last year, there were more than 300 instances of violent crimes, including three homicides.

Sanchez and Kristina Hayes, another Cragin resident, said they worry about the crime in the area, crime that they feel is being primarily spurred by the increased presence of gangs. Buildings along nearby North Lockwood and North Laramie avenues are regularly tagged by gang graffiti, neighbors said.  Hayes, who has lived in Cragin for about five years with her husband and children and describes it as "still a nice neighborhood," said she believes the crime especially started to increase about a year and a half ago.


Part 1: Make the chart below on your own paper.  Fill in the blanks with the correct answer :
Noun – Person, Place, Thing, Idea
Verb – Shows Action
Article – The words “the, a, an” – These words refer to a noun

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. Gilber Sanchez
  2. Remembers
Noun
Verb
Person
Shows Action

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. What do you think is causing the increase in gunfire?  Why?  Cite a line which shows this.

  1. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.

  1. What is the transferable vocabulary word #14 (pronounced) Hint:  What class do you give speeches in?


  1. Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

SUP 401 Locate important details in passages

They shuttle highly paid Facebook employees to and from the company’s headquarters in Silicon Valley, yet many say their pay is so low that they can’t afford to live in the area. Moreover, many complain that they start work around 6 a.m. and do not finish until 9 p.m., 15 hours later.

Now, some of these shuttle bus drivers, who get Facebook employees to work, are seeking representation by the Teamsters union. And, in a move to help make that happen, the union has written to Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, asking him to intervene on the drivers’™ behalf.

In a letter sent on Thursday, the top Teamsters official for Northern California urged Mr. Zuckerberg to press Facebook’s shuttle bus contractor to agree to bargain with the union on behalf of the 40 drivers who ferry Facebook employees to work.

While your employees earn extraordinary wages and are able to live and enjoy life in some of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the Bay Area, these drivers can’t afford to support a family, send their children to school, or, least of all, afford to even dream of buying a house anywhere near where they work,’ the Teamsters official, Rome Aloise, said in the letter.

Mr. Aloise added: ’It is reminiscent of a time when noblemen were driven around in their coaches by their servants. Frankly, little has changed; except the noblemen are your employees, and the servants are the bus drivers who carry them back and forth each day.’€


Part 1: Make the chart below on your own paper.  Fill in the blanks with the correct answer (person, place, thing, or idea). 

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. employees
  2. headquarters
Noun
Noun
Person
Place

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. Do you think a company like Facebook should pay their bus drivers a high salary (yearly pay)?

  1. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.

  1. What is the transferable vocabulary word #9?

  1. Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?


SUP 401 Locate important details in passages (Identify Articles and their roles)

Two people were arrested in Roswell, New Mexico, after they unintentionally dialed police immediately after burglarizing a home and discussed details of the alleged crime during their getaway while the call was being recorded by authorities, Roswell police said.  Aaron Burrell, 37, was arrested earlier this month after he unwittingly made a 911 call to police while driving away after he and Yvonne Thyberg, 35, allegedly stole a television from a house in Roswell in late September, police said.

“We basically robbed them, dude,” one of the two suspects could be heard saying on audio of the accidental 911 call released by police.  Suspected Car Thief Pocket-Dials 911 on Himself - Four Times
Dispatchers listened to the unintended confession for nearly 45 minutes as the duo continued to discuss their alleged heist.  “I know we should have gotten a lot more, but you know what, my only thing is that we got away safe, clean,” one of the suspects said, according to the 911 call..

In another snippet of the call, one of the suspects said: “We rolled over to Hervey Street and took it out of the [expletive] house.”  A Roswell police officer was sent to the address mentioned in the call and found that it had indeed been burglarized, Todd Wildermuth, public information officer for the Roswell Police, said.  Police nabbed the two after tracing the call to Burrell’s phone. Burrell denied that his phone called 911, claiming instead that the device “was picking up a conversation among people in an adjacent vehicle who were speaking very loudly,” according to ABC affiliate station KOAT-TV in Albuquerque.

Burrell was arrested last week on residential burglary, conspiracy to commit residential burglary and receiving-disposing of stolen property charges, according to police.  Thyberg was arrested earlier while she was in jail on a separate charge, and she was charged with residential burglary, conspiracy to commit residential burglar and tampering with evidence in this case, police said.

Part 1: Make the chart below on your own paper and fill in the blanks with the correct answers:
Noun = Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb = Shows Action
Article= Refers (points) to a noun.  Remember, there are only 3 articles: THE, A, AND

Word
Part of Speech
What does it do?
  1. People
  2. Arrested
  3. New Mexico
Noun
Verb
Noun
Person
Shows Action
Place

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. Do you think these criminals should get more punishment for being stupid?  Why?

  1. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.

  1. What is the transferable vocabulary word #27 ?

  1. Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

  1. In paragraph 2, it says the call was accidental.  How could they have accidentally called the police?

  1. In paragraph 3, what was the criminal’s story about where the call came from?