Sunday, March 1, 2015

Trusting Strangers {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

We Trust Strangers, Even When It Doesn’t Make Sense to Do So
By Alice Park

1
There’s a reason why those bank scams on the internet continue to flourish. Because we feel guilty if we don’t trust people.Relationships, businesses, governments—almost every interaction people have is built on trust. eBay can’t survive without it. But why do we put so much faith in others? What makes us so sure that the person who puts a mint condition baby carriage up for sale a) Actually owns the carriage, b) Isn’t lying when he says it’s in mint condition, and c) will send the said carriage when you pay him?
2
David Dunning, a psychology professor at Cornell University and his colleagues, say that all rational behavior theories predict that people shouldn’t trust complete strangers. We have no way of knowing that the other person will do what he promises in any transaction, because we know nothing about that person. Any rational model of behavior predicts that the other person will renege on any promise as soon as it’s in his best interest to do so. Survival of the fittest and all.
3
But in a series of trust experiments with 645 undergraduates, the scientists found that 62% would give away a small sum of money even if their two options were that the other person would keep it all, or, if the person decided to return it, that both would get back a larger amount. If the students were actually calculating the odds of getting their money back or increasing it, only 20% would have taken the gamble.
4
What does that tell us about ourselves? That we’re more of a society than we thought. Most of the participants talked about politeness and rudeness as motivating them to trust their fellow study subject, even if it meant potentially getting exploited by them. “Their behavior was a comment on the other person’s character,” says Dunning. By not giving up the money, in other words, the volunteers were concerned that they would be implying that the other subject was untrustworthy and a crook, because by keeping the money, they had decided it wasn’t going to be returned. “People feel a social duty to respect the other person,” says Dunning.
5
How does he know that the first person wasn’t simply acting out of greed over potentially quadrupling their payoff? Through other variations of this game, in which participants chose between trusting a stranger to return the money or a coin flip that would decide, people did not take such gambles on getting their money back if they were told the coin flip would determine whether they got their money back. “That tells us that people are responding to issues in the other person’s character,” says Dunning. “The signal they are sending is that ‘I respect your character.’ As soon as you take out that issue, people gamble at the rate that would be consistent with greed.”
6
You can interpret that as either being a sign of solidarity, an inexplicable sense of belonging to and being a member of a community in which everyone treats everyone with respect, or you can view it in a slightly more cynical way – that people trust others because they think they have to, and are guilted into acting in the more magnanimous way. Different people may justify their behavior in different ways, says Dunning. That’s because although most people will act in the more generous, way that shows respect and trust for their fellow man, that doesn’t mean that they believe internally that everyone is trustworthy. “The situation causes internal conflict,” he says. “We get 30% to 40% of people saying something like the odds are that I am going to get screwed, or not get the money back, but they still give up the $5 to the other person.”
7
That strength of community norms, or an obligation to act in ways that may be counter to their internal beliefs, is something that Dunning hopes to explore further. Does it come from an even deeper faith in the goodness of the world and an optimism that people are good and nice to each other? Perhaps. For now, it’s enough to know that even strangers tend to trust one another – even if it’s driven by a sense of obligation.


Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. bank
  2. scam
  3. flourish
Adj
Noun
verb

Modifies a noun
Idea
Shows action


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, why do bank scams on the internet flourish?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why shouldn’t people trust strangers?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what motivated the participants into trusting strangers? (2 things)
  4. According to paragraph 6, what is solidarity?
  5. According to paragraph 7, how does the article explain why people trust strangers?  (1 word)
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is optimism.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they would give $20.00 to a complete stranger if the stranger promised to return it to them tomorrow.  Why did they chose this answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. The strangers request was strange.
  2. The schools schedule for Tuesday is for the juniors only.
  3. The supporters votes will help elect Garcia as our new mayor.
  4. Todays lesson was about trusting strangers.
  5. The articles main idea involved the reasons people trust complete strangers.





http://time.com/103396/we-trust-strangers-even-when-it-doesnt-make-sense-to-do-so/

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Chicago Election {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Re-election battles typically are referendums on the incumbent, one reason Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia framed his Chicago mayoral candidacy as a reaction to perceived shortcomings in the style and performance of Rahm Emanuel.
2
"The mayor's decision to close 50 schools and drive teachers out on strike for the first time in 25 years was the defining moment for his administration," said Garcia, who is backed by the Chicago Teachers Union. "Mayor Emanuel likes to say he makes hard choices, but there is a difference between making hard choices and being hardheaded."
3
In forcing a runoff election with Emanuel, Garcia will almost certainly gain the campaign trail star power and political cash that seemed to elude him in the run-up to Tuesday's vote.  And that in itself is somewhat remarkable in an era when politics is increasingly defined by made-for-TV bombast and artful spin — things not naturally in Garcia's skill set.
4
"He's an odd bird in the sense that he's got two traits you rarely find in politicians these days, which are honesty and humility," said Maurice Sone, an attorney who oversees a Little Village community group that Garcia led years ago. "Don't let his soft demeanor surprise you. ... He's not confrontational. He just has a different way."
5
Garcia is something of an accidental candidate in the mayor's race, the third choice of progressive liberals who formed the core of his support base. Initially they hoped to coalesce around Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, but when she opted not to challenge Emanuel they threw their support behind Karen Lewis, the charismatic Chicago Teachers Union president.  Then Lewis took ill and recruited the 58-year-old Garcia to do battle with the mayor.
6
Born in Mexico but raised in Chicago's Little Village, Garcia has been involved in activist causes for most of his adult life. He was an early supporter of the late Mayor Harold Washington, and he won an aldermanic election in 1986 that proved crucial in helping the city's first black mayor secure control of the council from a bloc of white alderman that routinely obstructed his policies.
7
Later he served two terms in the state Senate before being targeted for ouster by a Hispanic political group allied with former Mayor Richard M. Daley. Garcia returned to public office in 2010 as a member of the County Board, where he now serves as Preckwinkle's floor leader. In the interim, he ran a Little Village-area community group active in pushing for voting rights, economic development issues, legal safeguards for immigrants without legal residency, violence prevention and other issues of concern to Latinos.
8
The group, now known as Enlace Chicago, drew headlines in 2001 as it led a nearly three-week hunger strike by parents who pressured city school officials into fulfilling a long-delayed promise to build a new high school in Little Village.
On Tuesday night, addressing a crowd of enthusiastic supporters, Garcia served notice that he planned to fashion his campaign over the next six weeks with the same sort of populist fervor that propelled Harold Washington into office three decades ago.
9
"Nobody thought we'd be here tonight," Garcia declared to cheers. "They wrote us off, they said we didn't have a chance. They said we didn't have any money, while they spent millions attacking us. Well, we're still standing. We're still running. And we're gonna win."



Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Re-election
  2. Battles
  3. referendums
Adj
Noun
Noun

Modifies a noun
Idea
Idea


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, who is the incumbent that is running for mayor?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what decision did the mayor make which Jesus Garcia thinks was a big mistake?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is Garcia now going to gain?  Why?  What has changed?
  4. According to paragraph 5, Garcia is an ‘accidental candidate’.  What do you think this means?  Can you cite a line which supports your idea?  Then do it!
  5. According to paragraph 8, what has the group Enlace done in the past to help communities?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is incumbent.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree with Garcia when he stated that closing 50 schools was a huge mistake for the current mayor.  Ask them for 2 reasons why they think this.  Write this information down!
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. Jesus Garcias campaign will now receive more money because of the run-off election.
  2. Garcia was raised in Chicagos Little Village.
  3. The supporters votes will help elect Garcia as our new mayor.
  4. Todays lesson was about the mayoral election.
  5. The articles main idea involved the idea that Jesus Garcia is now in a run-off election with Rahm Emanuel.









Monday, February 23, 2015

Confessions of a Convicted Counterfeiter: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Every week, in a different California bar, a counterfeit $100 bill is passed. The bogus bill is a true work of art, fraud worthy of an Elmyr De Hory or a Clifford Irving. The bill is hand-drawn — pen and ink meticulously set down on paper. The mysterious artful dodger has been at his craft for years, despite the best work of the Secret Service. He only makes $100 a week, and the painstaking effort can hardly be worth the monetary gain. The source of his satisfaction must be more complex. Perhaps it’s the laugh on the government. Perhaps he only needs $100 a week. Whatever the motivation, I can appreciate the skill. My own career in counterfeiting started the same way; I hand-drew my first funny money. But my motivation was more basic: I wanted lots of money. I was 8 years old.
2
It was 1948, when even a $1 bill was considered valuable. A Cadillac in those days cost less than $4,000; a good bicycle less than $50. A dime could get you into a Saturday movie; a little bottle of Grapette soda cost a nickel; and a single penny bought a piece of bubble gum with a picture card of a big-league baseball player. Girls had just become a big attraction for me, which made me even more aware of how important it was to have money. Everything, at age 8, began to register in my mind as dollar signs.
3
It didn’t take me long to reason that making my own dollars would be the best way to get all the things I wanted. I knew nothing yet of the printing business, but I had energy and youthful imagination. I collected a number of colored pencils and a ruler and attempted to draw a good copy of a dollar bill.
4
I worked for a month on that single, but the only thing that came out right was the size. I was discouraged, but I still believed I would someday make my own money. All I had to do, I knew, was learn how. I read books on counterfeiting, printing, and photography, and never told a soul what I had in mind. And when it came to getting money — real money — I was industrious. I mowed summer lawns, threw paper routes, and worked as an usher in a theater during my mid-teens — and longed for great wealth.
5
But the event that probably had the biggest impact on my desire to be a counterfeiter was my arrival in Dallas at age 11 in 1951. That summer I pedaled my bicycle all over North Dallas, visiting airports, car dealerships, and stores. In the showroom of Clarence Talley Auto sat a stunning black Jaguar XK120 roadster with red leather interior and a polished wood dash. There were two Sunbeam-Talbots — one a gorgeous, metallic-blue convertible, the other a metallic-tan four-door. Both had real, English-smelling leather interiors. They were exotic, sexy machines, machines to fire a boy’s desire. And I wanted them all. I realized I would need great amounts of money — sums that I could see no way of earning by conventional means. My dedication to accumulating wealth became so complete while I was growing up that I religiously refused to waste my money or my health on smoking or drinking.
6
I was 16 when I first saw an advertisement for a machine that would copy any color. It was exactly what I was looking for. At last, I was going to make some money and get a new 1956 Lincoln Premiere Coupe in solid black, with a continental spare-tire kit on the back, flipper hubcaps and chrome side pipes. I was going to have a big Beechcraft Model SO Twin Bonanza in three-tone aqua blue.
7
The copying machine eventually arrived. I set it up that night in my bedroom with illicit anticipation, a feeling I would know often in the years ahead. But too quickly, I learned some glaring truths. The machine indeed would copy any color — in black and white. The chemicals were wet and very nasty. And copies could be made only on one side of the special paper. It wouldn’t work for copying money.
8
Once my disappointment wore off, my imagination and resilient nature took over. I cranked off numerous black-and-white copies of both sides of a $ 10 bill, and went to work with colored pencils again. Compared to my previous hand-drawn bill, the finished products looked good to my young eyes. But now came the problem of trying to stick the front and back copies together. No matter what kind of glue I used, the result was the same-a fat 10. I made only 30 or 40 of them and carried them with me for a long time. They never felt right enough to pass, but a couple of times I brought them out while friends were around. I could tell my friends thought the 10s were real, but I knew the copies were just not good enough.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. California
  2. Counterfeit
  3. Bogus
  4. Bill
Noun
Adjective
Adjective
Noun
Place
Modifies a noun

Thing

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, how is the counterfeit bill the author is writing about made?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what made the author aware of the importance of having money?
  3. According to paragraph 3, What did the author use to make his first counterfeit bill?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what did the author not do in order to help him accumulate money?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is imagination.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they would knowingly use a counterfeit $100 bill at a store or movie?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  correct the following sentence using an apostrophe:


  1. They were exotic, sexy machines, machines to fire a boys desire




Article from http://www.dmagazine.com/publications/d-magazine/1981/december/crime-making-money

Sunday, February 22, 2015

How Gangs Took Over Prisons 1: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

by Graeme Wood
1
On a clear morning this past February, the inmates in the B Yard of Pelican Bay State Prison filed out of their cellblock a few at a time and let a cool, salty breeze blow across their bodies. Their home, the California prison system’s permanent address for its most hardened gangsters, is in Crescent City, on the edge of a redwood forest—about four miles from the Pacific Ocean in one direction and 20 miles from the Oregon border in the other. This is their yard time.
2
Most of the inmates belong to one of California’s six main prison gangs: Nuestra Familia, the Mexican Mafia, the Aryan Brotherhood, the Black Guerrilla Family, the Northern Structure, or the Nazi Lowriders (the last two are offshoots of Nuestra Familia and the Aryan Brotherhood, respectively). The inmates interact like volatile chemicals: if you open their cells in such a way as to put, say, a lone member of Nuestra Familia in a crowd of Mexican Mafia, the mix can explode violently. So the guards release them in a careful order.
3
“Now watch what they do,” says Christopher Acosta, a corrections officer with a shaved head who worked for 15 years as a front-line prison guard and now runs public relations for Pelican Bay. We are standing with our backs to a fence and can see everything.
4
At first, we seem to be watching a sullen but semi-random parade of terrifying men—heavily tattooed murderers, thieves, and drug dealers walking past one of five casual but alert guards. Some inmates, chosen for a strip search, drop their prison blues into little piles and then spin around, bare-assed, to be scrutinized. Once inspected, they dress and walk out into the yard to fill their lungs with oxygen after a long night in the stagnant air of the cellblock. The first Hispanic inmate to put his clothes on walks about 50 yards to a concrete picnic table, sits down, and waits. The first black inmate goes to a small workout area and stares out at the yard intently. A white guy walks directly to a third spot, closer to the basketball court. Another Hispanic claims another picnic table. Slowly it becomes obvious that they have been moving tactically: each has staked out a rallying point for his group and its affiliates.
5
Once each gang has achieved a critical mass—about five men—it sends off a pair of scouts. Two of the Hispanics at the original concrete picnic table begin a long, winding stroll. “They’ll walk around, get within earshot of the other groups, and try to figure out what’s going down on the yard,” Acosta says. “Then they can come back to their base and say who’s going to attack who, who’s selling what.”
6
Eventually, about 50 inmates are in the yard, and the guards have stepped back and congregated at their own rallying point, backs to the fence, with Acosta. The men’s movements around the yard are so smooth and organized, they seem coordinated by invisible traffic lights. And that’s a good thing. “There’s like 30 knives out there right now,” Acosta says. “Hidden up their rectums.”
7
Understanding how prison gangs work is difficult: they conceal their activities and kill defectors who reveal their practices. This past summer, however, a 32-year-old academic named David Skarbek published The Social Order of the Underworld, his first book, which is the best attempt in a long while to explain the intricate organizational systems that make the gangs so formidable. His focus is the California prison system, which houses the second-largest inmate population in the country—about 135,600 people, slightly more than the population of Bellevue, Washington, split into facilities of a few thousand inmates apiece. With the possible exception of North Korea, the United States has a higher incarceration rate than any other nation, at one in 108 adults. (The national rate rose for 30 years before peaking, in 2008, at one in 99. Less crime and softer punishment for nonviolent crimes have caused the rate to decline since then.)
8
Skarbek’s primary claim is that the underlying order in California prisons comes from precisely what most of us would assume is the source of disorder: the major gangs, which are responsible for the vast majority of the trade in drugs and other contraband, including cellphones, behind bars. “Prison gangs end up providing governance in a brutal but effective way,” he says. “They impose responsibility on everyone, and in some ways the prisons run more smoothly because of them.” The gangs have business out on the streets, too, but their principal activity and authority resides in prisons, where other gangs are the main powers keeping them in check.
9
Skarbek is a native Californian and a lecturer in political economy at King’s College London. When I met him, on a sunny day on the Strand, in London, he was craving a taste of home. He suggested cheeseburgers and beer, which made our lunch American not only in topic of conversation but also in caloric consumption. Prison gangs do not exist in the United Kingdom, at least not with anything like the sophistication or reach of those in California or Texas, and in that respect Skarbek is like a botanist who studies desert wildflowers at a university in Norway.

http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/09/how-gangs-took-over-prisons/379330/

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Inmates
  2. Salty
  3. Breeze
Noun
Adjective
Noun

Person
Modifies a noun
Thing


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what do you think ‘yard time’ refers to?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why are the prisoners released in ‘careful order’ ?
  3. According to paragraph 4, why are the prisoners eager to breathe the outside air?
  4. According to paragraph 7, why is it difficult to understand how prison gangs work?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is decline.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.


Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask you partner if they agree that gangs are allowed to police themselves in prison, like what it states in the article. 
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe
The second sentence contains a word using an apostrophe.  Write down the word, and write down if the apostrophe is there for a contraction, singular possessive, or plural possessive.


Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Career Spotlight – LEGO : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
How would you like to play with LEGO all day? To children and adults alike, a pile of LEGO offers such possibilities—whole worlds and inhabitants in that familiar tableau of right-angles and vibrant mismatched colors. And then some people take their LEGO a little more seriously.  When scaled up, the bricks allow for exquisite and complex constructions, becoming exact pixels in large structures. It's a huge undertaking to construct those large-scale models that you see in places like LEGOLAND. What's it like to actually spend your days knee-deep in LEGO? We spoke with Adora Lo about her work as a LEGO model designer and how she ended up working in the medium of plastic bricks.
2
Tell us a little about yourself and your experience:
My name is Adora, and I'm a Model Designer and Team Lead at Merlin Studios Carlsbad, based out of LEGOLAND California Resort. I design new architectural and sculptural models for LEGOLAND and LEGOLAND Discovery Center attractions worldwide. I also manage a team of nine model builders, taking care of any issues they may have. I've been working here for almost five years, although I only became a designer and team lead in the last year and a half. I was a Model Builder before that.
3
What drove you to choose your career path?
My graduation coincided with a harsh job market in 2009, so I worked part-time jobs while looking for full time architectural work. While searching for architectural jobs, I found a posting for a LEGO model builder and decided to give it a shot. I didn't make it in the first round, but I got an email a while later asking me to interview again. I got the position after that. I thought I would only be a model builder for a year or two and go back to architecture, but after the first year, I enjoyed it so much that I decided to stay.
4
What kind of education and experience did you need?
In our model shop, there are people from all different backgrounds. There are people straight out of high school and people with graphic arts or public policy degrees. I have a Masters of Architecture from UCLA, and a B.A. in Architecture from UC Berkeley, so the architectural training I received gave me a strong structural building background and a step up in learning all the software that I needed to know for this job. It was also good that I love solving problems, and I can handle stress pretty well. My previous job was as an after­ school teacher, dealing with 20 fifth graders everyday who didn't want to be there.
5
What kinds of things do you do beyond what people see? What do you actually spend the majority of your time doing?
What most people see are the finished models in one of the LEGOLAND parks. Our model shop is offsite and the public never gets to see what goes on inside, mostly because we're working on models for parks and attractions months or years in advance. I spend a lot of time on the computer, using LEGO's proprietary software and Rhino3D to create scaled down buildings or sculptural models. I also build prototypes to figure out how a model will come together, since there are construction techniques that are easier to visualize and test by physically building a model. I'm also a Team Lead, so I hand out projects to my builders, quality check their work, and facilitate other administrative needs. I think something that the public will never see is me or my co-­team lead trying to break LEGO models to test them for durability.
6
What misconceptions do people often have about your job?
I think a lot of people think I just play with LEGO all day, when in fact it's a lot of math and puzzles. One of the first things we memorize is the size of a 1x1 LEGO plate (8mm x 8mm x 3.2mm). If you consider that turning five plates onto their side is equal to two studs in width, and then do that over the course of a 100 stud building with various patterns mixed in, the math starts to get a little intense. Also people tend to think I work for The LEGO Group, which I do not. I work for Merlin Entertainments, which is a British­-based attractions company that owns the LEGOLAND resorts around the world, along with Madam Tussauds and The Dungeons, amongst other attractions.
7
What are your average work hours?
I average 40 hours a week, although I usually work nine hours a day for nine weekdays, then take the 10th day off.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Inhabitants
  2. Mismatched
  3. Colors
Noun
Adjective
Person
Modifies a noun

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, some people spend their time ‘knee-deep’ in Lego.  What do you think this means?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what does Adora do at work?
  3. According to paragraph 3, why did Adora stay working with Lego bricks when she wanted to be an architect?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what 3 things does Adora do being a team lead?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is construct.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they have any experience playing or building with Lego bricks.  What did they build?  Did they enjoy it?  If they have not, ask them why.
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7? Or do you have similar experiences? Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.

  1. Adora, a team leader, does the following at work:


Article taken from
http://lifehacker.com/career-spotlight-what-i-do-as-a-lego-model-designer-1686123935


Wednesday, February 11, 2015

TSA: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A traveler detained for more than 20 hours after a search of energy bars and a sports watch in his carry-on bag at an airport has sued the Transportation Security Administration and accused a TSA supervisor of lying. Architect and runner Roger Vanderklok said he was arrested after asking TSA workers how to file a complaint. He said he spent nearly a day in a holding cell without being questioned by police or given the chance to call his wife, who was frantic.
2
"It's difficult to lose control of your existence. That's what it amounts to," Vanderklok said Wednesday. "I was absolutely terrified."  According to Vanderklok, the TSA supervisor lied to police and again in court when he said the 58-year-old runner had made a verbal threat during the January 2013 security check at Philadelphia International Airport. Vanderklok was on his way to Miami for a half-marathon.
3
The TSA said it was concerned about the gear in his bag: what turned out to be the watch and the power bars, wrapped in a small PVC pipe for protection. Electronics and "organic mass" can be used to make bombs, TSA Supervisor Charles Kieser testified at an April 2013 criminal trial.  But Vanderklok's lawyer, Thomas Malone, argued in court: "I don't think PowerBars are consistent with bombings, nor are watches."
4
A judge quickly dismissed threat charges against Vanderklok, who filed his lawsuit Jan. 23, seeking unspecified damages for what he considers a retaliatory arrest. The Philadelphia Daily News first reported on the lawsuit Wednesday. Malone doesn't challenge the TSA's effort to investigate the items in the carry-on but says airport security footage contradicts Kieser's testimony.  Kieser testified an agitated Vanderklok raised his hands and repeatedly pointed a finger at his face.
5
"The passenger made a bomb threat to me," Kieser testified, according to a transcript. "(He said) I'll bring a bomb through here any day that I want ... and you'll never find it."  Vanderklok insists he said nothing about a bomb. The security video shows him standing calmly with his arms in front of him holding a laptop, his lawsuit says.
6
The TSA does not comment on pending lawsuits, a spokesman said. Kieser does not appear to have a listed phone number.  The city's chief deputy solicitor, Craig Straw, said his office had not seen the lawsuit.  Vanderklok flies frequently for work and had set a goal of running 60 half-marathons by his 60th birthday. He never made it to Miami. And a back injury has stalled his tally at 38.
7
"I'm not going to get there," he said Wednesday, sitting in the book-lined condominium he shares with his wife.  He said he hopes to return to form soon and avoid any more travel drama.
8
In another TSA case in Philadelphia, a former college student recently won a $25,000 Department of Justice settlement and police retraining after he was held for five hours over Arabic flashcards in his pocket that included the words for "bomb" and "kill."

http://news.yahoo.com/suit-man-held-20-hours-asking-file-tsa-210427933.html

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Philadelphia
  2. Detained
  3. Energy
Noun
Verb
Adjective
Place
Shows Action
Modifies a noun

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, why was Roger Vanderklok detained?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what did the TSA supervisor lie about?
  3. According to paragraph 3, why was the TSA concerned about what Vanderklok had in his bag?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what did Kieser say Vanderklok had said?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is detained.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they think agree with the TSA agent arresting Vanderklock? Or do they think that the TSA agent lied?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7? Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.

  1. A person should never bring the following on a plane:






Sunday, February 8, 2015

Flight 235 crashed: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
The death toll from a TransAsia Airways plane crash in Taiwan rose to 40 on Saturday, authorities said, as details emerged that both engines lost power.  Flight 235 crashed into a river in Taiwan's capital, Taipei, shortly after takeoff Wednesday with 58 people on board.  Three others remain unaccounted for, while 15 people survived, authorities said.  As crews search for the missing, more revelations emerged on what led to the tragedy.
2
Pilots grappled with engine problems before the plane clipped a bridge and plunged into a river, Taiwan's aviation safety agency said.  During the crisis in the cockpit, the pilots received a series of alerts, starting with an alarm related to one of the engines and followed by five stall warnings as the plane lost thrust.  The two engines on the ATR 72 turboprop aircraft stopped producing power one after the other, leaving the plane flying without thrust for more than a minute, according to the agency.  The alarms sounded for the first engine that ceased power output, but the crew was then heard discussing switching off the other engine, before it also stopped generating power. Investigators are looking into the crew's actions and are trying to understand why the second engine was shut off.
3
Data show that the pilots should have received a visual warning detailing which of the two engines had a problem, said Thomas Wang, managing director of the Aviation Safety Council.  "There would be a message: 'number two engine flameout' to the pilot, and of course the corresponding checklist for that," Wang said.  He would not comment further on whether the crew followed proper procedures in responding to that warning.
4
"At this moment we just release the numbers, the parameter we've confirmed, we did not release any judgment who did what at this time," he said.  Seconds later, pilots issued a mayday alert to air traffic control, announcing an engine flameout. They eventually managed to restart one of the engines that had been shut down, but it was too late to prevent a crash.
5
Aviation Safety Council officials said Saturday that the top priorities are finishing up the transcript of the cockpit voice recorder, and examining the wreckage, specifically the engines and the cockpit.  They are also gathering information to try to understand why the first engine auto feathered after take off, which meant it was no longer producing thrust. Normally, the blades of a propeller will auto feather, or rotate, when an engine fails, in order to reduce drag, and enable the plane to be safely flown on a single engine, Wang explained.
6
Final analysis of Flight GE235's flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder is months away, investigators said.  The reported engine problems dovetail with the account of Huang Chin-shun, a 72-year-old survivor of the crash.  "I thought something's wrong with the engine because I always take this flight," Huang told CNN affiliate ETTV from his hospital bed Thursday.  Taipei Fire Department Lt. You Chia-yu said that some passengers were still inside the plane, banging on windows, when first responders arrived.  These firefighters pried open one of the aircraft's doors, with some of them taking off gear to fit through a "really tight" space and get inside.

"The visibility in the water was really low, so we knew we had to just get in there first. It was really chaotic," You said. "... We believe we got them all out in time."  Stephen Fredrick, a pilot who once flew ATRs for American Airlines, told CNN this week that it looked like Flight GE235 was gliding when dashboard cameras on the ground captured the moments before it crashed into the river.  Fredrick pointed to the position of the nose -- slightly down -- and the wings, which were level. He said he also thought the plane may have lost power in one or both of the engines.

TransAsia was involved in another deadly disaster in July. Forty-eight people died after an ATR 72 aircraft operated by the airline crashed as it was attempting to land in the Taiwanese Penghu Islands during bad weather.



Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Death
  2. Toll
  3. Taiwan
Adj
Noun
Noun

Modifies a noun
Idea
Place


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what is the ‘death toll’ as of the writing of this article?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what was the first alarm the pilots received?
  3. According to paragraph 3, how would the pilot know which engine had a problem?
  4. According to paragraph 6, how long will it take to get all the information investigators need to figure out what went wrong with this flight?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is parameter.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner what they would do if they knew a  plane they were on was going to crash into a river?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.

  1. According to this article, the following things happened before the crash:




Article from:   http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/07/asia/taiwan-transasia-plane-crash/index.html


Wednesday, February 4, 2015

How To Survive A Blizzard In Style: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
You may have heard about a big East Coast blizzard hitting soon. Big storms are like the crimes on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, in that they happen everywhere, but always get more coverage when they happen to New Yorkers.
Wherever you are, though, riding out a climactic weather event can go one of two ways: Either you fill yourself with Storm Chili and Kool Aid, or you end up having to be shuttled to a FEMA trailer by the fire department. Obviously, one of these paths is better than the other, and the difference is preparation.
2
Your preparedness amounts to three things: food, drinks, and entertainment. For our purposes, we're assuming you're getting together with your friends and/or roommates to ride out the catastrophe in relative comfort. If you're alone, pare down the food and drink to serve one and ignore the entertainment section.  The rest of you: Come with me if you want to live.
3
FOOD ESSENTIALS: Ground beef, Beans,  Eggs, Hot sauce, Rice
The most important thing during a storm is a giant pot of chili. Chili is delicious, cheap, filling, keeps well and is fun to cook. If you don't know how to make chili, learn. Your chili pot should have no fewer than two (preferably three) servings per person, plus rice to fill it out. While you're at the market, grab backup rice, beans, meat, and a few eggs (plus, yeah, toilet paper) so you can subsist on a rotating diet of chili, fried rice, huevos rancheros, and rice & beans until gastric distress forces you to one of the few open hospitals.
4
DRINK ESSENTIALS:  Juice and coffee, Water
Obviously, a key component of riding out any storm is enough to drink. With nothing else to do, you're going to need to make the hours go by faster; gazing from your empty fridge out into the storm and back is enough to instill madness. I recommend around 10 bottles per person per day for indoor storm survival. Spread out over roughly 14 hours, this amount keeps everyone loose and sleepy without drumming up latent anger or mania.
5
Additionally, a fun way to pass the storm is a group meal. Yes, that's mostly the domain of that shrill type of person who needs to event-ize everything—this is the exception. Having a giant bowl of Hurricane Chili or a Russian Chili is a great way to keep the gang from slipping into a state of pure torpor. Juice and coffee are essential components of waking up on a stormy morning. Your mouth probably tastes like chili and Kool Aid; you just slept 16 hours; and you need something, anything that doesn't taste like day-old chili. Lo and behold, a glass of OJ and a cup of coffee, and you're happily drifting through the diner in your mind.
6
Finally, you'll also want water. This should be coming out of the tap. Water not coming out of the tap is a major red flag. Honestly, if you think you're going to lose water and you're buying those water-cooler jugs, just leave. Mosey. If you've got a five-hour head start on the storm, you can be relaxing in a hotel in an entirely different climate zone by the time your friends even discover that their supermarket has become a cannibal holocaust devoid of even kale.
7
ENTERTAINMENT ESSENTIALS: movies, Tea candles, Hand-cranked flashlight-radio combo
In most cases, your biggest risk during the storm is neither starvation nor dehydration: It's cabin fever. Needlessly escalating drama and the unearthing of secrets can either occur within your TV or in front of it, and if you're going to be trapped with all these people, you'll prefer the former. The real storm should not be of human emotion.
8
The combination of good music and collaborative cooking followed by a bootleg movie/Netflix marathon is a classic for a reason. For best results, develop a theme early. Watch a good season of The Simpsons, or do the Star Wars thing, or find out which James Bond movie is the most racist.
9
GOING OUTSIDE
Eventually, your supplies of beer and chili and Quiz Hat tolerance will be exhausted. Like all good things, the storm must end. If it's an urban blizzard, you'll be left with an impossible quantity of greasy slush and road salt that will soak you to the bone and ruin everything it touches. If you're anywhere else, the plowman has recreated The Wall from Game of Thrones at the end of your driveway. There is almost no way to avoid any of this. Put on your big boots, shovel yourself out, and get trudging. Winter is only beginning.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Blizzard
  2. Coverage
  3. New Yorkers
Noun
Noun
Noun

Thing
Idea
Person


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what  makes the difference between surviving the storm or getting hauled away by FEMA?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what three things make up preparedness?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what are the benefits of chili?
  4. According to paragraph 6, where should your water be coming from?  If water is not coming from the tap, what should you have done?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is dehydration.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner what food they would want to have if they were trapped inside because of a winter storm for several days.
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.
Write the following sentence on your paper and complete it with the types of things you need to survive a big storm.

  1. According to this article, you should have the following things to survive a blizzard:

Article from” http://adequateman.deadspin.com/how-to-survive-a-blizzard-in-style-1681841193/+robharvilla

This article was modified for school-aged children.