Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Stop Hating Yourself {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
We're all prone to a little self-loathing now and again, and sometimes that's a dark road that can only get worse. Thankfully, it's not too difficult to fight back if you can get yourself in the right mindsetConfidence is important, but sometimes it's easier to wallow in a pool of self-doubt so deep that being confident seems like a far off goal. Hating yourself is a different game where you're so obsessed with your failings that you refuse to accept the good. You're sitting in front of an audience applauding you, but it's not like you're saving the world. You've got the perfect job at the perfect company, but you're not managing the people you want to. You finished a 10K, but can't complete a marathon. It can go on and on. No matter how much you accomplish, you still hate yourself. Let's fix that.
2
Oftentimes, these moments of self-hatred are fleeting, spurned by a rough day at the office or a particularly nasty breakup. In those types of cases, you can approach it like you would any other mental hiccup: find a quick solution. Using an example culled from Anneli Rufus' book Unworthy, Psych Central suggests finding the place where you hate yourself less:
3
For starters, Rufus found a place where she hated herself less: by the seashore … a wild, rolling, splashing sea. "The sea expects nothing from me," she explains. "I cannot disappoint the sea. It does not care. It does not hate me, does not love me, does not wonder who I am or what I wear, because it does not care whether I am or am not there. The sea roars, either way."
Your place could be anywhere. It might be the local coffee shop, the hackerspace in your city, a particular park, or whatever. The point is to find that place where you can go where you're reminded that the world's a lot bigger than just you. If you're anything like me, it means getting as far away from your work or house as possible. I've taken to a weird spot on the beach along the bike path where few people tend to hang out. It's quiet, remote, and a great place to reset everything stupid in my head.
4
Identify Your Niche. Similarly, find your own niche in the world. Once you identify the traits that make you awesome, it's a lot easier to concentrate on them and feel better about yourself. Instead of feeling bad about what you can't do, you can think about all the things you can.
5
There's a mind trap that easy to fall into when you hate yourself, where your accomplishments don't feel like much. Chances are, that's at least partially because you're concentrating on the wrong things. I may not be a the greatest at small talk, but that doesn't mean I suck at conversation. It's easier to beat yourself up for what you can't do instead of figuring out what you're best at.
6
Finding your niche works on a lot of levels too. Your niche might be a character trait (you're kind, you're a good problem solver, whatever) or it might be a skillset. It doesn't really matter what it is, what's important is to find a focus on your strengths instead of your weaknesses.  You have a lot of tools to really figure out what you're best at. The most obvious is to simply write out a list of your traits, but if you're not sure what your niche is, it's time to think more like an explorer. Try new things, find that one thing that you're better at than most people, and run with it. It's amazing what having "one good thing" can do your overall self-respect.


One of the problems with self-loathing often stems from an overabundance of humility. On its own, humility isn't a bad trait to have. Taken too far it becomes a hindrance that prevents you from acknowledging your accomplishments and accepting compliments.

The trick is to make some attempts to get to know yourself better. A self-loather doesn't see themselves as other people see them. In turn, it's easy to disregard someone's compliment because it doesn't feel genuine.   But there is no right or wrong way to see yourself, no Archimedean point of reference around which others' perceptions must rotate. Another person's assessment of you is just as valid as yours—and possibly more so with respect to how you relate to other people, whether these relationships are familial, friendly, or romantic. In simple terms, people who think of themselves as nice may come off as obnoxious jerks to others, and people who think they have nothing to offer other people may be seen by others as very interesting. The point is that you don't know as much about yourself as you think...
This is one of those cognitive truths that's hard to correct for. If you're a self-loather, that feeling of inadequacy is around no matter what you do. The trick, according to Psychology Today, is to do your best to remember that your self-perception isn't complete, nor is it any more "right" than someone elses. You can learn a lot from how other people see you, but you'll need to accept what you learn and try to integrate that into your own views.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?
  1. Self
  2. Loathing
  3. Mindset
Adjective
Noun
Noun

About myself
Not liking
Our state of mind.  What we are thinking about


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what might self-loathing people be obsessed about?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what might cause these moments of ‘self-hatred’?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what should you identify?  What does this mean?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what should you focus on?
  5. The transferable vocabulary word is solution.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner (or do by yourself today).

  1. What do you think your niche might be?  What accomplishments do you have in this area, even if they are super small in your mind, they are important!
  2. Has there ever been a time when you doubted your ability to do something like schoolwork or playing a sport? Just answer yes or no.  After reading this article, do you think you were too hard on yourself?  Why do you think you were?
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. Marks abilities were awesome.
  2. Stevens mindset is full of self-loathing.
  3. Tonys phone does not have any apps.
  4. The mens version of the iPhone is in a leather case.
  5. Kevins phone is the iPhone Plus. Its screen is large.
Article from http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2015/02/how-to-stop-hating-yourself-and-start-down-the-path-to-self-respect/

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Nintendo : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Before they made video games, Nintendo made loads of other sweet stuff. One of the sweetest was this Ultraman board game, which has art that looks as awesome today as it did in 1966.
2
Nintendo Co., Ltd. is a Japanese multinational consumer electronics company headquartered in Kyoto, Japan. Nintendo is the world's largest video game company by revenue.  Founded on September 23, 1889  by Fusajiro Yamauchi, it originally produced handmade hanafuda playing cards.  By 1963, the company had tried several small niche businesses, such as cab services and love hotels.
3
Abandoning previous ventures in favor of toys in the 1960s, Nintendo then developed into a video game company in the 1970s, ultimately becoming one of the most influential in the industry and Japan's third most valuable listed company with a market value of over US$85 billion. Nintendo of America is also the majority owner of the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team. The word "Nintendo" can be roughly translated from Japanese to English as "leave luck to heaven." As of March 31, 2014, Nintendo reports historically cumulative sales of over 670.43 million hardware units and 4.23 billion software units,
4
1889–1956: As a card company
Nintendo was founded as a card company in late 1889, later (1951) named Nintendo Koppai (Nintendo Playing Card Co. Ltd.). Based in Kyoto, Japan, the business produced and marketed a playing card game called Hanafuda. The handmade cards soon became popular, and Yamauchi hired assistants to mass-produce cards to satisfy demand. Nintendo now continues to manufacture playing cards in Japan and organizes its own contract bridge tournament called the "Nintendo Cup".
5
In 1956, Hiroshi Yamauchi, grandson of Fusajiro Yamauchi, visited the U.S. to talk with the United States Playing Card Company, the dominant playing card manufacturer there. He found that the world's biggest company in his business was only using a small office. This was a turning point when Yamauchi realized the limitations of the playing card business. He then gained access to Disney's characters and put them on the playing cards to drive sales.
6
In 1963, Yamauchi renamed Nintendo Playing Card Co. Ltd. to Nintendo Co., Ltd.  The company then began to experiment in other areas of business using newly injected capital. During this period of time between 1963 and 1968, Nintendo set up a taxi company, a love hotel chain, a TV network, a food company (selling instant rice) and several other ventures. All of these ventures eventually failed, and after the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, playing card sales dropped, and Nintendo's stock price plummeted.
7
In 1966, Nintendo moved into the Japanese toy industry with the Ultra Hand, an extendable arm developed by its maintenance engineer Gunpei Yokoi in his free time. Yokoi was moved from maintenance to the new "Nintendo Games" department as a product developer. Nintendo continued to produce popular toys, including the Ultra Machine, Love Tester and the Kousenjuu series of light gun games. Despite some successful products, Nintendo struggled to meet the fast development and manufacturing turnaround required in the toy market, and fell behind the well-established companies such as Bandai and Tomy.
8
In 1973, its focus shifted to family entertainment venues with the Laser Clay Shooting System, using the same light gun technology used in Nintendo's Kousenjuu series of toys, and set up in abandoned bowling alleys. Following some success, Nintendo developed several more light gun machines (such as the light gun shooter game Wild Gunman) for the emerging arcade scene. While the Laser Clay Shooting System ranges had to be shut down following excessive costs, Nintendo had found a new market.

                       
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Video
  2. Games
  3. Kyoto, Japan
Adjective
Noun
Noun

Modifies a noun
Thing
Place


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what did Nintendo make before video games?
  2. According to paragraph 2, Nintendo tried several ‘niche’ businesses.  Using context clues, what do you think this word means?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is the translation of Nintendo? Why do you think the company might have chosen this name?
  4. According to paragraph 5, how did Yamauchi realize that a playing card company had limitations?  Cite a line which supports this.
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is revenue.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they knew what Nintendo did before they became a giant in the video game industry. Which video game company does your partner think is the best video game company ?  Why do they think this?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article?

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.
Write the following sentence on your paper and complete it with 3 things that Nintendo did before making video games.


  1. Before making video games, Nintendo did the following: 

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Artificial Intelligence : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Bill Gates has a warning for humanity: Beware of artificial intelligence in the coming decades, before it's too late.
Microsoft's co-founder joins a list of science and industry notables, including famed physicist Stephen Hawking and Internet innovator Elon Musk, in calling out the potential threat from machines that can think for themselves. Gates shared his thoughts on AI on Wednesday in a Reddit "AskMeAnything" thread, a Q&A session conducted live on the social news site that has also featured President Barack Obama and World Wide Web founder Tim Berners-Lee.
2
"I am in the camp that is concerned about super intelligence," Gates said in response to a question about the existential threat posed by AI. "First, the machines will do a lot of jobs for us and not be super intelligent. That should be positive if we manage it well. A few decades after that, though, the intelligence is strong enough to be a concern."
3
Gates, who is co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, isn't the only one worried. Musk, the billionaire inventor and founder of SpaceX and CEO of electric car maker Tesla Motors, is not an expert in AI. But he did join a growing list of hundreds of researchers and professors in the field who signed an open letter earlier this month that proposed proper safeguards be put in place to research and develop such intelligence without humans losing control.
4
The reason they're worried is that AI isn't science fiction anymore. In stories and movies, AI is often presented as a good idea gone horribly wrong. In "The Matrix" movie trilogy, machines deem humanity a threat and enslave people in a virtual existence so they can feed off the electricity generated by the human body. When the Skynet computer system in "The Terminator" movie series becomes sentient, it wages a multiyear war using human-like robots designed to kill. HAL 9000, the socio-pathic supercomputer from "2001: A Space Odyssey," is now a cinematic icon -- HAL's robotic tone and malevolent quotes have become pop culture tropes.
5
Back in the real world, Apple's voice-based personal assistant Siri may seem a little dumb now, but AI is getting smarter as researchers develop ways to let machines teach themselves and mine the deep trove of data produced by our many connected gadgets. IBM's Watson supercomputer has moved on from besting Jeopardy ` to conducting medical research and diagnosis, and researchers earlier this month detailed a new computer program that can beat anyone at poker. A need to worry? Of course not, but Gates and others are trying to imagine the worst.
6
Musk in October called AI development "summoning the demon," and has invested in the space to keep his eye on it. Hawking, writing for The Independent in May 2014, also expressed his concerns. "Whereas the short-term impact of AI depends on who controls it, the long-term impact depends on whether it can be controlled at all," Hawking wrote.  Gates' warning comes as Microsoft is developing a machine intelligence called Cortana. The software, based off the well-known AI character from the company's Halo series of video games, is available in Microsoft's Windows Phone mobile software. Cortana will soon make its way onto PCs as part of Windows 10, the new version of the company's popular operating system. Windows 10 with Cortana is due later this year.
7
Though Gates stepped down as CEO in 2000 and left his role as chairman last year when CEO Satya Nadella took over as chief, he remains a technology adviser in the company, which is the world's largest maker of software. Gates is also working on what he calls Microsoft's Personal Agent project, a kind of software secretary designed to help you remember things and advise you on what to pay attention to.  "The idea that you have to find applications and pick them and they each are trying to tell you what is new is just not the efficient model - the agent will help solve this," he said. "It will work across all your devices."
8
Gates offered a glimmer of hope for those fearful of our future robot overlords.
A Reddit user asked whether computer programming was a smart career choice for people who aren't expert-level coders, because automation and AI will likely replace all lower-level programmers in the future.

"It is safe for now! It is also a lot of fun and helps shape your thinking on all issues to be more logical," he answered. "Understanding how to program will always be useful."

Article from:  http://www.cnet.com/news/bill-gates-is-worried-about-artificial-intelligence-too/

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Bill Gates
  2. Artificial
  3. Intelligence
Noun
Adjective
Noun

person
Modifies a noun
Idea


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what is Bill Gates afraid of?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what do we have to do to AI in order for it to be safe?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what types of people signed the open letter which warns of the dangers of AI?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what does the Skynet computer in the movie Terminator do once it becomes sentient?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is inventor.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree that computers becoming super intelligent could be dangerous.
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.
Write the following sentence on your paper and complete it with 3 things that Nintendo did before making video games.


  1. The following groups of people have signed an open letter warning of the dangers of artificial intelligence : 

Monday, October 31, 2016

New Car : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

So you've finally made it to the point where you can treat yourself to a new car. But you're past the point of searching Craigslist for thousand-dollar beaters; it's time to put the big-boy pants on and head to the dealership. Here's how to go car-shopping without getting taken for a ride.
2
Keep in mind that just because you know about cars doesn't mean you know how to shop for one. The dealers do this for a living; most people only make vehicle purchases every couple of years at most. But I do this for a living, too: I am a professional car-buying consultant, and every day I negotiate for car-shoppers who either don't have the time or simply don't want to deal with the hassle. (You can also find me on Jalopnik's Car Buying sub-blog.) The dealer's goal is to make as much money as possible; here is how you can save as much money as possible.
3
Most dealers are trained to ask you, "So, what do you want your monthly payments to be?" Don't fall into this trap. They can manipulate the numbers to hit that target, and you still might be overpaying for the car. Before hitting the dealership, you should know what your monthly budget is and work backwards; don't forget to factor in interest rates and your local tax title and tags. For example, if you can afford $500 per month and want to take a five-year loan, that gives you a budget of $30,000. However, when you factor in a five-percent sales tax and DMV processing fees, you are probably closer to $28,000. Of course, putting money down to reach that $500-per-month goal increases your spending power.
4
Also, check your credit and get pre-approved for financing from your local bank, credit union, or credit card. The last thing you want is to be at the mercy of the dealership to get a loan. A pre-approval forces the dealer to match or beat that rate.  Many people overspend on a car, and it has nothing to do with any "dealer tricks"—they simply buy more than they need. Take a serious look at your budget, your needs, your wants, and your lifestyle, then match a vehicle accordingly. If you have at least two children using car seats, you don't need an all-terrain SUV to project your masculinity when you drop the kiddies off at school. Get a minivan and understand the glory that is "sliding doors." You'll thank me later.
5
When it comes to loading up the options, choose carefully. Do you really need the navigation package when you have a smartphone? Do you have eyes, and do you use them while driving? If so, you may not want to spend the extra cash on what I call "bad driver" aids like blind-spot assist and back-up cameras. In some vehicles, of course, these extras are necessary; this is why the test drive is so important.
6
I don't care how many reviews you read—you won't know it's the right car for you until you actually drive it. And by drive it, I mean really drive it. None of this "quick spin around the block" garbage. Take it on the highway and give it some gas. (Don't go challenging people to a street race, though.) Make sure you're confident in how the car turns and brakes. Check your visibility—are there blind spots? If you carry around gear like car seats or sports equipment, bring all that with you and make sure it fits.
7
Before you go to the dealership, call and confirm that the dealer has what you want and make an appointment for a test drive. I cannot stress this enough, especially if you are a young lad interested in getting a fast car: Too often, if you stroll into a dealership, they think you're just there for a joyride. Making an appointment tells them you are a serious buyer and saves you time.  Once you've settled on a specific car, don't talk prices right in the dealership. This is where they have all the advantage; if you go this route, be prepared for the marathon of negotiating, with all the "Well, I have to talk to my manager" back-and-forth that implies. Instead, call or email a half-dozen dealers, tell them what you want, and have them email you a quote. Some dealers will do this, and some won't; if they give you the "You have to come in to discuss pricing" line, they're most likely what we call a "stealership." Just move on to the next one.
8
You can use third-party sites like TrueCar and Edmunds to know the "invoice" and the average transaction price. From there, you can get an idea on what kinds of discounts you can expect. If the average transaction price is $2,000 off the MSRP, don't expect a $5,000 discount when you negotiate. Know that depending on what you want and where you live, online car-shopping may not be that easy.


Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Vehicle
  2. Purchases
  3. Consultant
Adjective
Noun
Noun
Modifies a noun
Idea
Person

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. In paragraph 1, the idiom “taken for a ride” is used.  What do you think this means?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what is the dealer’s goal?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is the first thing you should figure out before buying a new car?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what does the term ‘options’ mean?  What were the examples?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is manipulate.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree that dealers are only trying to make as much money as possible.
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.
Write the following sentence on your paper and complete it with 3 options cars might have.


  1. The following are options one might find on a new car:

Monday, September 28, 2015

Alcohol Death and Reading for Information

Police are investigating the death of 19-year-old Rutgers University student Caitlyn Kovacs, who was pronounced dead in the hospital less than 20 minutes after friends carried her out of a frat house "in distress" at 3 a.m. on Sunday. The hospital thinks her death "may have been alcohol-related."

The Daily Targum, the student paper, reported that Kovacs "passed out" in the Delta Kappa Epsilon house. DKE headquarters says the chapter is cooperating with authorities. The Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office told NJ.com it did not intend to file charges related to the incident.

Kovacs was a sophomore majoring in animal sciences, who was "bubbly" and "happy" according to her friends. Rutgers has made grief counselors available to students in the wake of her death.

Part 1: Make the chart below on your own paper.  Fill in the blanks with the correct answer (person, place, thing, or idea). 

Word
Part of Speech
Noun or Verb
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea)
Or (Shows Action)
  1. Police
  2. Death
Noun
Noun
Person
Idea

LITERACY FOCUS

Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. Why do you think the girl was drinking enough to cause death?

  1. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.

  1. What is the transferable vocabulary word #12 ?

  1. Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject?


Transferable Vocabulary:

  1. Abandon: give up completely
  2. Abundant: Available in large quantities

Write down each transferable vocabulary word and write your own original sentence using that work.  Next, tell me a class where you might see that work in your reading.


Sunday, May 3, 2015

Hack a Banana Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Hey guys. It's funny, someone just mentioned MacGyver, because that was, like, I loved it, and when I was seven, I taped a fork to a drill and I was like, "Hey, Mom, I'm going to Olive Garden." And -- and it worked really well there. And you know, it had a profound effect on me. It sounds silly, but I thought, okay, the way the world works can be changed, and it can be changed by me in these small ways. And my relationship to especially human-made objects which someone else said they work like this, well, I can say they work a different way, a little bit.
2
And so, about 20 years later, I didn't realize the full effect of this, but I went to Costa Rica and I stayed with these Guaymí natives there, and they could pull leaves off of trees and make shingles out of them, and they could make beds out of trees, and they could -- I watched this woman for three days. I was there. She was peeling this palm frond apart, these little threads off of it, and she'd roll the threads together and make little thicker threads, like strings, and she would weave the strings together, and as the materiality of this exact very bag formed before my eyes over those three days, the materiality of the way the world works, of reality, kind of started to unravel in my mind, because I realized that this bag and these clothes and the trampoline you have at home and the pencil sharpener, everything you have is made out of either a tree or a rock or something we dug out of the ground and did some process to, maybe a more complicated one, but still, everything was made that way.
3
And so I had to start studying, who is it that's making these decisions? Who's making these things? How did they make them? What stops us from making them? Because this is how reality is created. So I started right away. I was at MIT Media Lab, and I was studying the maker movement and makers and creativity. And I started in nature, because I saw these Guaymís doing it in nature, and there just seems to be less barriers.
4
So I went to Vermont to Not Back to School Camp, where there's unschoolers who are just kind of hanging out and willing to try anything. So I said, "Let's go into the woods near this stream and just put stuff together, you know, make something, I don't care, geometrical shapes, just grab some junk from around you. We won't bring anything with us. And, like, within minutes, this is very easy for adults and teens to do. Here's a triangle that was being formed underneath a flowing stream, and the shape of an oak leaf being made by other small oak leaves being put together. A leaf tied to a stick with a blade of grass. The materiality and fleshiness and meat of the mushroom being explored by how it can hold up different objects being stuck into it. And after about 45 minutes, you get really intricate projects like leaves sorted by hue, so you get a color fade and put in a circle like a wreath.
5
And I'm like, "Wow, that's really amazing. He doesn't know, but he can show you." So his hands know and his intuition knows, but sometimes what we know gets in the way of what could be, especially when it comes to the human-made, human-built world. We think we already know how something works, so we can't imagine how it could work. We know how it's supposed to work, so we can't suppose all the things that could be possible.
6
So kids don't have as hard of a time with this, and I saw in my own son, I gave him this book. I'm a good hippie dad, so I'm like, "Okay, you're going to learn to love the moon. I'm going to give you some building blocks and they're nonrectilinear cactus building blocks, so it's totally legit." But he doesn't really know what to do with these. I didn't show him. And so he's like, "Okay, I'll just mess around with this." This is no different than the sticks are to the teens in the forest. Just going to try to put them in shapes and push on them and stuff. And before long, he's kind of got this mechanism where you can almost launch and catapult objects around, and he enlists us in helping him.
7
And at this point, I'm starting to wonder, what kind of tools can we give people, especially adults, who know too much, so that they can see the world as malleable, so they see themselves as agents of change in their everyday lives. Because the most advanced scientists are really just kind of pushing the way the world itself works, pushing what matter can do, the most advanced artists are just pushing the medium, and any sufficiently complicated task, whether you're a cook or a carpenter or you're raising a child -- anything that's complicated -- comes up with problems that aren't solved in the middle of it, and you can't do a good job getting it done unless you can say, "Okay, well we're just going to have to refigure this. I don't care that pencils are supposed to be for writing. I'm going to use them a different way."
Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what do you think the author did with his fork taped to a drill? 
  2. According to paragraph 2, what is ‘everything we have’ made out of?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what ‘intricate projects’ did the unschoolers make?  What do you think the author means by the word ‘unschoolers’ ?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what did the author give to his son to ‘mess around with’ ?  Why do you think he did this?
  5. According to paragraph 7, do you think that students in this school see the world as malleable? Malleable means changeable, so if you said yes or no, explain why you think this.  Give me an example from your own life, if you can.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is malleable .  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner


  1. Ask your partner how they answered question 5.  Did you agree with them with your own answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 5?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

Friday, May 1, 2015

Bill Gates – Epidemics CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}



1
When I was a kid, the disaster we worried about most was a nuclear war. That's why we had a barrel like this down in our basement, filled with cans of food and water. When the nuclear attack came, we were supposed to go downstairs, hunker down, and eat out of that barrel.
2
Today the greatest risk of global catastrophe doesn't look like this. Instead, it looks like this. If anything kills over 10 million people in the next few decades, it's most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war. Not missiles, but microbes. Now, part of the reason for this is that we've invested a huge amount in nuclear deterrents. But we've actually invested very little in a system to stop an epidemic. We're not ready for the next epidemic.
3
Let's look at Ebola. I'm sure all of you read about it in the newspaper, lots of tough challenges. I followed it carefully through the case analysis tools we use to track polio eradication. And as you look at what went on, the problem wasn't that there was a system that didn't work well enough, the problem was that we didn't have a system at all. In fact, there's some pretty obvious key missing pieces.
4
We didn't have a group of epidemiologists ready to go, who would have gone, seen what the disease was, seen how far it had spread. The case reports came in on paper. It was very delayed before they were put online and they were extremely inaccurate. We didn't have a medical team ready to go. We didn't have a way of preparing people. Now, Médecins Sans Frontières did a great job orchestrating volunteers. But even so, we were far slower than we should have been getting the thousands of workers into these countries. And a large epidemic would require us to have hundreds of thousands of workers. There was no one there to look at treatment approaches. No one to look at the diagnostics. No one to figure out what tools should be used. As an example, we could have taken the blood of survivors, processed it, and put that plasma back in people to protect them. But that was never tried.
5
So there was a lot that was missing. And these things are really a global failure. The WHO is funded to monitor epidemics, but not to do these things I talked about. Now, in the movies it's quite different. There's a group of handsome epidemiologists ready to go, they move in, they save the day, but that's just pure Hollywood.
6
The failure to prepare could allow the next epidemic to be dramatically more devastating than Ebola Let's look at the progression of Ebola over this year. About 10,000 people died, and nearly all were in the three West African countries. There's three reasons why it didn't spread more. The first is that there was a lot of heroic work by the health workers. They found the people and they prevented more infections. The second is the nature of the virus. Ebola does not spread through the air. And by the time you're contagious, most people are so sick that they're bedridden. Third, it didn't get into many urban areas. And that was just luck. If it had gotten into a lot more urban areas, the case numbers would have been much larger.
7
So next time, we might not be so lucky. You can have a virus where people feel well enough while they're infectious that they get on a plane or they go to a market. The source of the virus could be a natural epidemic like Ebola, or it could be bioterrorism. So there are things that would literally make things a thousand times worse.
8
In fact, let's look at a model of a virus spread through the air, like the Spanish Flu back in 1918. So here's what would happen: It would spread throughout the world very, very quickly. And you can see over 30 million people died from that epidemic. So this is a serious problem. We should be concerned.
9
But in fact, we can build a really good response system. We have the benefits of all the science and technology that we talk about here. We've got cell phones to get information from the public and get information out to them. We have satellite maps where we can see where people are and where they're moving. We have advances in biology that should dramatically change the turnaround time to look at a pathogen and be able to make drugs and vaccines that fit for that pathogen. So we can have tools, but those tools need to be put into an overall global health system. And we need preparedness.
10
The best lessons, I think, on how to get prepared are again, what we do for war. For soldiers, we have full-time, waiting to go. We have reserves that can scale us up to large numbers. NATO has a mobile unit that can deploy very rapidly. NATO does a lot of war games to check, are people well trained? Do they understand about fuel and logistics and the same radio frequencies? So they are absolutely ready to go. So those are the kinds of things we need to deal with an epidemic.
Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what disaster did the speaker worry about when he was a child?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what is likely to be the cause of the next global catastrophe?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what could they have done with the blood of survivors, if they had enough epidemiologists?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what was one of the reasons Ebola “did not spread more”?
  5. According to paragraph 7, the speaker says “Next time, we might not be so lucky.”  Do you agree with this statement?  Why?  Does this statement scare you?  Why?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is diagnostics .  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner
  1. Ask your partner how they answered question 5.  Did you agree with them with your own answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 5?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.


Sunday, April 19, 2015

How I Use Sonar to Navigate the World CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

https://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_kish_how_i_use_sonar_to_navigate_the_world?language=en



1
I was born with bilateral retinoblastoma, retinal cancer. My right eye was removed at seven months of age. I was 13 months when they removed my left eye. The first thing I did upon awakening from that last surgery was to climb out of my crib and begin wandering around the intensive care nursery, probably looking for the one who did this to me.  Evidently, wandering around the nursery was not a problem for me without eyes. The problem was getting caught.
2
It's impressions about blindness that are far more threatening to blind people than the blindness itself. Think for a moment about your own impressions of blindness. Think about your reactions when I first came onto the stage, or the prospect of your own blindness, or a loved one going blind. The terror is incomprehensible to most of us, because blindness is thought to epitomize ignorance and unawareness, hapless exposure to the ravages of the dark unknown. How poetic.
3
Fortunately for me, my parents were not poetic. They were pragmatic. They understood that ignorance and fear were but matters of the mind, and the mind is adaptable. They believed that I should grow up to enjoy the same freedoms and responsibilities as everyone else. In their own words, I would move out -- which I did when I was 18 -- I will pay taxes  and they knew the difference between love and fear. Fear immobilizes us in the face of challenge. They knew that blindness would pose a significant challenge. I was not raised with fear. They put my freedom first before all else, because that is what love does.
4
Now, moving forward, how do I manage today? The world is a much larger nursery. Fortunately, I have my trusty long cane, longer than the canes used by most blind people. I call it my freedom staff. It will keep me, for example, from making an undignified departure from the stage. (Laughter) I do see that cliff edge. They warned us earlier that every imaginable mishap has occurred to speakers up here on the stage. I don't care to set a new precedent.
5
But beyond that, many of you may have heard me clicking as I came onto the stage  with my tongue. Those are flashes of sound that go out and reflect from surfaces all around me, just like a bat's sonar, and return to me with patterns, with pieces of information, much as light does for you. And my brain, thanks to my parents, has been activated to form images in my visual cortex, which we now call the imaging system, from those patterns of information, much as your brain does. I call this process flash sonar. It is how I have learned to see through my blindness, to navigate my journey through the dark unknowns of my own challenges, which has earned me the moniker "the remarkable Batman."
6
Now, Batman I will accept. Bats are cool. Batman is cool. But I was not raised to think of myself as in any way remarkable. I have always regarded myself much like anyone else who navigates the dark unknowns of their own challenges. Is that so remarkable? I do not use my eyes, I use my brain.
7
Now, someone, somewhere, must think that's remarkable, or I wouldn't be up here, but let's consider this for a moment. Everyone out there who faces or who has ever faced a challenge, raise your hands. Whoosh. Okay. Lots of hands going up, a moment, let me do a head count. This will take a while.  Okay, lots of hands in the air. Keep them up. I have an idea. Those of you who use your brains to navigate these challenges, put your hands down. Okay, anyone with your hands still up has challenges of your own.
8
So we all face challenges, and we all face the dark unknown, which is endemic to most challenges, which is what most of us fear, okay? But we all have brains that allow us, that activate to allow us to navigate the journey through these challenges. Okay? Case in point: I came up here and -- (Clicking) -- they wouldn't tell me where the lectern was. So you can't trust those TED folks. "Find it yourself," they said. So -- (Laughter) And the feedback for the P.A. system is no help at all.
9
So now I present to you a challenge. So if you'd all close your eyes for just a moment, okay? And you're going to learn a bit of flash sonar. I'm going to make a sound. I'm going to hold this panel in front of me, but I'm not going to move it. Just listen to the sound for a moment. Shhhhhhhhhh. Okay, nothing very interesting. Now, listen to what happens to
Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

1. According to paragraph 1, how did the speaker get “retinoblastoma” ? Born with it
2. According to paragraph 2, what does the speaker say blindness epitomizes to most people? Ignorance and unawareness
3. Do you agree with the author about what he explains to us in question #2? Yes or No
4. According to paragraph 3, what did the speaker’s parents understand? Freedom is love
5. After reading paragraph 5, why do you think the speaker  clicks while he is on stage?    To see
6. The transferable vocabulary word is sonar .  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner
7. Ask your partner how they answered question 5.  Did you agree with them with your own answer?
8. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 5?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.

9. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.