Thursday, March 19, 2015

Think Your Email is Private? {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Twenty-five years ago, scientists at CERN created the World Wide Web. Since then, the Internet has transformed the way we communicate, the way we do business, and even the way we live. In many ways, the ideas that gave birth to Google, Facebook, Twitter, and so many others, have now really transformed our lives, and this has brought us many real benefits such as a more connected society. However, there are also some downsides to this. Today, the average person has an astounding amount of personal information online, and we add to this online information every single time we post on Facebook, each time we search on Google, and each time we send an email.
2
Now, many of us probably think, well, one email, there's nothing in there, right? But if you consider a year's worth of emails, or maybe even a lifetime of email, collectively, this tells a lot. It tells where we have been, who we have met, and in many ways, even what we're thinking about. And the more scary part about this is our data now lasts forever, so your data can and will outlive you. What has happened is that we've largely lost control over our data and also our privacy.
3
So this year, as the web turns 25, it's very important for us to take a moment and think about the implications of this. We have to really think. We've lost privacy, yes, but actually what we've also lost is the idea of privacy itself. If you think about it, most of us here today probably remember what life was like before the Internet, but today, there's a new generation that is being taught from a very young age to share everything online, and this is a generation that is not going to remember when data was private. So we keep going down this road, 20 years from now, the word 'privacy' is going to have a completely different meaning from what it means to you and I.
4
So, it's time for us to take a moment and think, is there anything we can do about this? And I believe there is. Let's take a look at one of the most widely used forms of communication in the world today: email. Before the invention of email, we largely communicated using letters, and the process was quite simple. You would first start by writing your message on a piece of paper, then you would place it into a sealed envelope, and from there, you would go ahead and send it after you put a stamp and address on it. Unfortunately, today, when we actually send an email, we're not sending a letter. What you are sending, in many ways, is actually a postcard, and it's a postcard in the sense that everybody that sees it from the time it leaves your computer to when it gets to the recipient can actually read the entire contents.
5
So, the solution to this has been known for some time, and there's many attempts to do it. The most basic solution is to use encryption, and the idea is quite simple. First, you encrypt the connection between your computer and the email server. Then, you also encrypt the data as it sits on the server itself. But there's a problem with this, and that is, the email servers also hold the encryption keys, so now you have a really big lock with a key placed right next to it. But not only that, any government could lawfully ask for and get the key to your data, and this is all without you being aware of it.
6
So the way we fix this problem is actually relatively easy, in principle: You give everybody their own keys, and then you make sure the server doesn't actually have the keys. This seems like common sense, right? So the question that comes up is, why hasn't this been done yet?
7
Well, if we really think about it, we see that the business model of the Internet today really isn't compatible with privacy. Just take a look at some of the biggest names on the web, and you see that advertising plays a huge role. In fact, this year alone, advertising is 137 billion dollars, and to optimize the ads that are shown to us, companies have to know everything about us. They need to know where we live, how old we are, what we like, what we don't like, and anything else they can get their hands on. And if you think about it, the best way to get this information is really just to invade our privacy. So these companies aren't going to give us our privacy. If we want to have privacy online, what we have to do is we've got to go out and get it ourselves.
8
For many years, when it came to email, the only solution was something known as PGP, which was quite complicated and only accessible to the tech-savvy. Here's a diagram that basically shows the process for encrypting and decrypting messages. So needless to say, this is not a solution for everybody, and this actually is part of the problem, because if you think about communication, by definition, it involves having someone to communicate with. So while PGP does a great job of what it's designed to do, for the people out there who can't understand how to use it, the option to communicate privately simply does not exist. And this is a problem that we need to solve. So if we want to have privacy online, the only way we can succeed is if we get the whole world on board, and this is only possible if we bring down the barrier to entry. I think this is actually the key challenge that lies in the tech community. What we really have to do is work and make privacy more accessible.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what do we add to every time we post on Facebook?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what lasts forever?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is the new generation being taught?
  4. According to paragraph 4, why is your email more like a postcard than a letter?
  5. According to paragraph 7 & 8, why do you think today’s Internet is not compatible with privacy?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is invention.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they have ever sent an email that they wanted to be absolutely private.  Did they think no one else could read it after they sent it?  Why? 
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

1.    Your emails information is not private.
2.    Theres a problem with trying to encrypt and decrypt your emails information.
3.    Your email – its more like a postcard than a letter.
4.    Your computers screen is pretty dirty.

5.    Marks computer is cleaner than yours.

From: http://www.ted.com/talks/andy_yen_think_your_email_s_private_think_again?language=en

Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1

1
In the summer of 2011, as a tourist, I visited the rainforests of Borneo for the very first time, and as you might imagine, it was the overwhelming sounds of the forest that struck me the most. There's this constant cacophony of noise. Some things actually do stick out. For example, this here is a big bird, a rhinoceros hornbill. This buzzing is a cicada. This is a family of gibbons. It's actually singing to each other over a great distance.
2
The place where this was recorded was in fact a gibbon reserve, which is why you can hear so many of them, but in fact the most important noise that was coming out of the forest that time was one that I didn't notice, and in fact nobody there had actually noticed it. So, as I said, this was a gibbon reserve. They spend most of their time rehabilitating gibbons, but they also have to spend a lot of their time protecting their area from illegal logging that takes place on the side. And so if we take the sound of the forest and we actually turn down the gibbons, the insects, and the rest, in the background, the entire time, in recordings you heard, was the sound of a chainsaw at great distance. They had three full-time guards who were posted around this sanctuary whose job was in fact to guard against illegal logging, and one day, we went walking, again as tourists, out into the forest, and within five minutes' walk, we stumbled upon somebody who was just sawing a tree down, five minutes' walk, a few hundred meters from the ranger station. They hadn't been able to hear the chainsaws, because as you heard, the forest is very, very loud.
3
It struck me as quite unacceptable that in this modern time, just a few hundred meters away from a ranger station in a sanctuary, that in fact nobody could hear it when someone who has a chainsaw gets fired up. It sounds impossible, but in fact, it was quite true.  So how do we stop illegal logging? It's really tempting, as an engineer, always to come up with a high-tech, super-crazy high-tech solution, but in fact, you're in the rainforest. It has to be simple, it has to be scalable, and so what we also noticed while we were  there was that everything we needed was already there. We could build a system that would allow us to stop this using what's already there.
4
Who was there? What was already in the forest? Well, we had people. We had this group there that was dedicated, three full-time guards, that was dedicated to go and stop it, but they just needed to know what was happening out in the forest. The real surprise, this is the big one, was that there was connectivity out in the forest. There was cell phone service way out in the middle of nowhere. We're talking hundreds of kilometers from the nearest road, there's certainly no electricity, but they had very good cell phone service, these people in the towns were on Facebook all the time, they're surfing the web on their phones, and this sort of got me thinking that in fact it would be possible to use the sounds of the forest, pick up the sounds of chainsaws programmatically, because people can't hear them, and send an alert. But you have to have a device to go up in the trees. So if we can use some device to listen to the sounds of the forest, connect to the cell phone network that's there, and send an alert to people on the ground, perhaps we could have a solution to this issue for them.
5
But let's take a moment to talk about saving the rainforest, because it's something that we've definitely all heard about forever. People in my generation have heard about saving the rainforest since we were kids, and it seems that the message has never changed: We've got to save the rainforest, it's super urgent, this many football fields have been destroyed yesterday. and yet here we are today, about half of the rainforest remains, and we have potentially more urgent problems like climate change.
6
But in fact, this is the little-known fact that I didn't realize at the time: Deforestation accounts for more greenhouse gas than all of the world's planes, trains, cars, trucks and ships combined. It's the second highest contributor to climate change. Also, according to Interpol, as much as 90 percent of the logging that takes place in the rainforest is illegal logging, like the illegal logging that we saw. So if we can help people in the forest enforce the rules that are there, then in fact we could eat heavily into this 17 percent and potentially have a major impact in the short term. It might just be the cheapest, fastest way to fight climate change.
7
And so here's the system that we imagine. It looks super high tech. The moment a sound of a chainsaw is heard in the forest, the device picks up the sound of the chainsaw, it sends an alert through the standard GSM network that's already there to a ranger in the field who can in fact show up in real time and stop the logging. It's no more about going out and finding a tree that's been cut. It's not about seeing a tree from a satellite in an area that's been clear cut, it's about real-time intervention.
7
So I said it was the cheapest and fastest way to do it, but in fact, actually, as you saw, they weren't able to do it, so it may not be so cheap and fast. But if the devices in the trees were actually cell phones, it could be pretty cheap. Cell phones are thrown away by the hundreds of millions every year, hundreds of millions in the U.S. alone, not counting the rest of the world, which of course we should do, but in fact, cell phones are great. They're full of sensors. They can listen to the sounds of the forest. We do have to protect them. We have to put them in this box that you see here, and we do have to power them. Powering them is one of the greater engineering challenges that we had to deal with, because powering a cell phone under a tree canopy, any sort of solar power under a tree canopy, was an as-yet-unsolved problem, and that's this unique solar panel design that you see here, which in fact is built also from recycled byproducts of an industrial process

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what was overwhelming for the author?
  2. According to paragraph 2, how many guards protected the sanctuary?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is the author’s profession? What does this make him want to do?  Cite the line which supports this.
  4. According to paragraph 4, what did the author find surprising about the rain forest?
  5. According to paragraph 6, what do you think deforestation is, and explain what it is doing to the earth.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is intervention.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they think real-time intervention is a better method of catching illegal loggers.  Why?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. The authors idea came to him when he visited the rain forest for the first time.
  2. The rain forests problem is illegal loggers.
  3. The sanctuarys protections was just three guards.
  4. I wonder where the mens room is, in the rain forest.
From: http://www.ted.com/talks/topher_white_what_can_save_the_rainforest_your_used_cell_phone?language=en

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Stop Hating Yourself {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
We're all prone to a little self-loathing now and again, and sometimes that's a dark road that can only get worse. Thankfully, it's not too difficult to fight back if you can get yourself in the right mindsetConfidence is important, but sometimes it's easier to wallow in a pool of self-doubt so deep that being confident seems like a far off goal. Hating yourself is a different game where you're so obsessed with your failings that you refuse to accept the good. You're sitting in front of an audience applauding you, but it's not like you're saving the world. You've got the perfect job at the perfect company, but you're not managing the people you want to. You finished a 10K, but can't complete a marathon. It can go on and on. No matter how much you accomplish, you still hate yourself. Let's fix that.
2
Oftentimes, these moments of self-hatred are fleeting, spurned by a rough day at the office or a particularly nasty breakup. In those types of cases, you can approach it like you would any other mental hiccup: find a quick solution. Using an example culled from Anneli Rufus' book Unworthy, Psych Central suggests finding the place where you hate yourself less:
3
For starters, Rufus found a place where she hated herself less: by the seashore … a wild, rolling, splashing sea. "The sea expects nothing from me," she explains. "I cannot disappoint the sea. It does not care. It does not hate me, does not love me, does not wonder who I am or what I wear, because it does not care whether I am or am not there. The sea roars, either way."
Your place could be anywhere. It might be the local coffee shop, the hackerspace in your city, a particular park, or whatever. The point is to find that place where you can go where you're reminded that the world's a lot bigger than just you. If you're anything like me, it means getting as far away from your work or house as possible. I've taken to a weird spot on the beach along the bike path where few people tend to hang out. It's quiet, remote, and a great place to reset everything stupid in my head.
4
Identify Your Niche. Similarly, find your own niche in the world. Once you identify the traits that make you awesome, it's a lot easier to concentrate on them and feel better about yourself. Instead of feeling bad about what you can't do, you can think about all the things you can.
5
There's a mind trap that easy to fall into when you hate yourself, where your accomplishments don't feel like much. Chances are, that's at least partially because you're concentrating on the wrong things. I may not be a the greatest at small talk, but that doesn't mean I suck at conversation. It's easier to beat yourself up for what you can't do instead of figuring out what you're best at.
6
Finding your niche works on a lot of levels too. Your niche might be a character trait (you're kind, you're a good problem solver, whatever) or it might be a skillset. It doesn't really matter what it is, what's important is to find a focus on your strengths instead of your weaknesses.  You have a lot of tools to really figure out what you're best at. The most obvious is to simply write out a list of your traits, but if you're not sure what your niche is, it's time to think more like an explorer. Try new things, find that one thing that you're better at than most people, and run with it. It's amazing what having "one good thing" can do your overall self-respect.


One of the problems with self-loathing often stems from an overabundance of humility. On its own, humility isn't a bad trait to have. Taken too far it becomes a hindrance that prevents you from acknowledging your accomplishments and accepting compliments.

The trick is to make some attempts to get to know yourself better. A self-loather doesn't see themselves as other people see them. In turn, it's easy to disregard someone's compliment because it doesn't feel genuine.   But there is no right or wrong way to see yourself, no Archimedean point of reference around which others' perceptions must rotate. Another person's assessment of you is just as valid as yours—and possibly more so with respect to how you relate to other people, whether these relationships are familial, friendly, or romantic. In simple terms, people who think of themselves as nice may come off as obnoxious jerks to others, and people who think they have nothing to offer other people may be seen by others as very interesting. The point is that you don't know as much about yourself as you think...
This is one of those cognitive truths that's hard to correct for. If you're a self-loather, that feeling of inadequacy is around no matter what you do. The trick, according to Psychology Today, is to do your best to remember that your self-perception isn't complete, nor is it any more "right" than someone elses. You can learn a lot from how other people see you, but you'll need to accept what you learn and try to integrate that into your own views.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What do I ‘think’ this word means?
  1. Self
  2. Loathing
  3. Mindset
Adjective
Noun
Noun

About myself
Not liking
Our state of mind.  What we are thinking about


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what might self-loathing people be obsessed about?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what might cause these moments of ‘self-hatred’?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what should you identify?  What does this mean?
  4. According to paragraph 6, what should you focus on?
  5. The transferable vocabulary word is solution.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner (or do by yourself today).

  1. What do you think your niche might be?  What accomplishments do you have in this area, even if they are super small in your mind, they are important!
  2. Has there ever been a time when you doubted your ability to do something like schoolwork or playing a sport? Just answer yes or no.  After reading this article, do you think you were too hard on yourself?  Why do you think you were?
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. Marks abilities were awesome.
  2. Stevens mindset is full of self-loathing.
  3. Tonys phone does not have any apps.
  4. The mens version of the iPhone is in a leather case.
  5. Kevins phone is the iPhone Plus. Its screen is large.
Article from http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2015/02/how-to-stop-hating-yourself-and-start-down-the-path-to-self-respect/

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Trusting Strangers {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

We Trust Strangers, Even When It Doesn’t Make Sense to Do So
By Alice Park

1
There’s a reason why those bank scams on the internet continue to flourish. Because we feel guilty if we don’t trust people.Relationships, businesses, governments—almost every interaction people have is built on trust. eBay can’t survive without it. But why do we put so much faith in others? What makes us so sure that the person who puts a mint condition baby carriage up for sale a) Actually owns the carriage, b) Isn’t lying when he says it’s in mint condition, and c) will send the said carriage when you pay him?
2
David Dunning, a psychology professor at Cornell University and his colleagues, say that all rational behavior theories predict that people shouldn’t trust complete strangers. We have no way of knowing that the other person will do what he promises in any transaction, because we know nothing about that person. Any rational model of behavior predicts that the other person will renege on any promise as soon as it’s in his best interest to do so. Survival of the fittest and all.
3
But in a series of trust experiments with 645 undergraduates, the scientists found that 62% would give away a small sum of money even if their two options were that the other person would keep it all, or, if the person decided to return it, that both would get back a larger amount. If the students were actually calculating the odds of getting their money back or increasing it, only 20% would have taken the gamble.
4
What does that tell us about ourselves? That we’re more of a society than we thought. Most of the participants talked about politeness and rudeness as motivating them to trust their fellow study subject, even if it meant potentially getting exploited by them. “Their behavior was a comment on the other person’s character,” says Dunning. By not giving up the money, in other words, the volunteers were concerned that they would be implying that the other subject was untrustworthy and a crook, because by keeping the money, they had decided it wasn’t going to be returned. “People feel a social duty to respect the other person,” says Dunning.
5
How does he know that the first person wasn’t simply acting out of greed over potentially quadrupling their payoff? Through other variations of this game, in which participants chose between trusting a stranger to return the money or a coin flip that would decide, people did not take such gambles on getting their money back if they were told the coin flip would determine whether they got their money back. “That tells us that people are responding to issues in the other person’s character,” says Dunning. “The signal they are sending is that ‘I respect your character.’ As soon as you take out that issue, people gamble at the rate that would be consistent with greed.”
6
You can interpret that as either being a sign of solidarity, an inexplicable sense of belonging to and being a member of a community in which everyone treats everyone with respect, or you can view it in a slightly more cynical way – that people trust others because they think they have to, and are guilted into acting in the more magnanimous way. Different people may justify their behavior in different ways, says Dunning. That’s because although most people will act in the more generous, way that shows respect and trust for their fellow man, that doesn’t mean that they believe internally that everyone is trustworthy. “The situation causes internal conflict,” he says. “We get 30% to 40% of people saying something like the odds are that I am going to get screwed, or not get the money back, but they still give up the $5 to the other person.”
7
That strength of community norms, or an obligation to act in ways that may be counter to their internal beliefs, is something that Dunning hopes to explore further. Does it come from an even deeper faith in the goodness of the world and an optimism that people are good and nice to each other? Perhaps. For now, it’s enough to know that even strangers tend to trust one another – even if it’s driven by a sense of obligation.


Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. bank
  2. scam
  3. flourish
Adj
Noun
verb

Modifies a noun
Idea
Shows action


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, why do bank scams on the internet flourish?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why shouldn’t people trust strangers?
  3. According to paragraph 4, what motivated the participants into trusting strangers? (2 things)
  4. According to paragraph 6, what is solidarity?
  5. According to paragraph 7, how does the article explain why people trust strangers?  (1 word)
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is optimism.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they would give $20.00 to a complete stranger if the stranger promised to return it to them tomorrow.  Why did they chose this answer?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. The strangers request was strange.
  2. The schools schedule for Tuesday is for the juniors only.
  3. The supporters votes will help elect Garcia as our new mayor.
  4. Todays lesson was about trusting strangers.
  5. The articles main idea involved the reasons people trust complete strangers.





http://time.com/103396/we-trust-strangers-even-when-it-doesnt-make-sense-to-do-so/

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Chicago Election {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Re-election battles typically are referendums on the incumbent, one reason Cook County Commissioner Jesus "Chuy" Garcia framed his Chicago mayoral candidacy as a reaction to perceived shortcomings in the style and performance of Rahm Emanuel.
2
"The mayor's decision to close 50 schools and drive teachers out on strike for the first time in 25 years was the defining moment for his administration," said Garcia, who is backed by the Chicago Teachers Union. "Mayor Emanuel likes to say he makes hard choices, but there is a difference between making hard choices and being hardheaded."
3
In forcing a runoff election with Emanuel, Garcia will almost certainly gain the campaign trail star power and political cash that seemed to elude him in the run-up to Tuesday's vote.  And that in itself is somewhat remarkable in an era when politics is increasingly defined by made-for-TV bombast and artful spin — things not naturally in Garcia's skill set.
4
"He's an odd bird in the sense that he's got two traits you rarely find in politicians these days, which are honesty and humility," said Maurice Sone, an attorney who oversees a Little Village community group that Garcia led years ago. "Don't let his soft demeanor surprise you. ... He's not confrontational. He just has a different way."
5
Garcia is something of an accidental candidate in the mayor's race, the third choice of progressive liberals who formed the core of his support base. Initially they hoped to coalesce around Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle, but when she opted not to challenge Emanuel they threw their support behind Karen Lewis, the charismatic Chicago Teachers Union president.  Then Lewis took ill and recruited the 58-year-old Garcia to do battle with the mayor.
6
Born in Mexico but raised in Chicago's Little Village, Garcia has been involved in activist causes for most of his adult life. He was an early supporter of the late Mayor Harold Washington, and he won an aldermanic election in 1986 that proved crucial in helping the city's first black mayor secure control of the council from a bloc of white alderman that routinely obstructed his policies.
7
Later he served two terms in the state Senate before being targeted for ouster by a Hispanic political group allied with former Mayor Richard M. Daley. Garcia returned to public office in 2010 as a member of the County Board, where he now serves as Preckwinkle's floor leader. In the interim, he ran a Little Village-area community group active in pushing for voting rights, economic development issues, legal safeguards for immigrants without legal residency, violence prevention and other issues of concern to Latinos.
8
The group, now known as Enlace Chicago, drew headlines in 2001 as it led a nearly three-week hunger strike by parents who pressured city school officials into fulfilling a long-delayed promise to build a new high school in Little Village.
On Tuesday night, addressing a crowd of enthusiastic supporters, Garcia served notice that he planned to fashion his campaign over the next six weeks with the same sort of populist fervor that propelled Harold Washington into office three decades ago.
9
"Nobody thought we'd be here tonight," Garcia declared to cheers. "They wrote us off, they said we didn't have a chance. They said we didn't have any money, while they spent millions attacking us. Well, we're still standing. We're still running. And we're gonna win."



Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Re-election
  2. Battles
  3. referendums
Adj
Noun
Noun

Modifies a noun
Idea
Idea


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, who is the incumbent that is running for mayor?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what decision did the mayor make which Jesus Garcia thinks was a big mistake?
  3. According to paragraph 3, what is Garcia now going to gain?  Why?  What has changed?
  4. According to paragraph 5, Garcia is an ‘accidental candidate’.  What do you think this means?  Can you cite a line which supports your idea?  Then do it!
  5. According to paragraph 8, what has the group Enlace done in the past to help communities?
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is incumbent.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they agree with Garcia when he stated that closing 50 schools was a huge mistake for the current mayor.  Ask them for 2 reasons why they think this.  Write this information down!
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe.  Write the sentence.  Add an apostrophe to correct the underlined word.

  1. Jesus Garcias campaign will now receive more money because of the run-off election.
  2. Garcia was raised in Chicagos Little Village.
  3. The supporters votes will help elect Garcia as our new mayor.
  4. Todays lesson was about the mayoral election.
  5. The articles main idea involved the idea that Jesus Garcia is now in a run-off election with Rahm Emanuel.









Monday, February 23, 2015

Confessions of a Convicted Counterfeiter: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
Every week, in a different California bar, a counterfeit $100 bill is passed. The bogus bill is a true work of art, fraud worthy of an Elmyr De Hory or a Clifford Irving. The bill is hand-drawn — pen and ink meticulously set down on paper. The mysterious artful dodger has been at his craft for years, despite the best work of the Secret Service. He only makes $100 a week, and the painstaking effort can hardly be worth the monetary gain. The source of his satisfaction must be more complex. Perhaps it’s the laugh on the government. Perhaps he only needs $100 a week. Whatever the motivation, I can appreciate the skill. My own career in counterfeiting started the same way; I hand-drew my first funny money. But my motivation was more basic: I wanted lots of money. I was 8 years old.
2
It was 1948, when even a $1 bill was considered valuable. A Cadillac in those days cost less than $4,000; a good bicycle less than $50. A dime could get you into a Saturday movie; a little bottle of Grapette soda cost a nickel; and a single penny bought a piece of bubble gum with a picture card of a big-league baseball player. Girls had just become a big attraction for me, which made me even more aware of how important it was to have money. Everything, at age 8, began to register in my mind as dollar signs.
3
It didn’t take me long to reason that making my own dollars would be the best way to get all the things I wanted. I knew nothing yet of the printing business, but I had energy and youthful imagination. I collected a number of colored pencils and a ruler and attempted to draw a good copy of a dollar bill.
4
I worked for a month on that single, but the only thing that came out right was the size. I was discouraged, but I still believed I would someday make my own money. All I had to do, I knew, was learn how. I read books on counterfeiting, printing, and photography, and never told a soul what I had in mind. And when it came to getting money — real money — I was industrious. I mowed summer lawns, threw paper routes, and worked as an usher in a theater during my mid-teens — and longed for great wealth.
5
But the event that probably had the biggest impact on my desire to be a counterfeiter was my arrival in Dallas at age 11 in 1951. That summer I pedaled my bicycle all over North Dallas, visiting airports, car dealerships, and stores. In the showroom of Clarence Talley Auto sat a stunning black Jaguar XK120 roadster with red leather interior and a polished wood dash. There were two Sunbeam-Talbots — one a gorgeous, metallic-blue convertible, the other a metallic-tan four-door. Both had real, English-smelling leather interiors. They were exotic, sexy machines, machines to fire a boy’s desire. And I wanted them all. I realized I would need great amounts of money — sums that I could see no way of earning by conventional means. My dedication to accumulating wealth became so complete while I was growing up that I religiously refused to waste my money or my health on smoking or drinking.
6
I was 16 when I first saw an advertisement for a machine that would copy any color. It was exactly what I was looking for. At last, I was going to make some money and get a new 1956 Lincoln Premiere Coupe in solid black, with a continental spare-tire kit on the back, flipper hubcaps and chrome side pipes. I was going to have a big Beechcraft Model SO Twin Bonanza in three-tone aqua blue.
7
The copying machine eventually arrived. I set it up that night in my bedroom with illicit anticipation, a feeling I would know often in the years ahead. But too quickly, I learned some glaring truths. The machine indeed would copy any color — in black and white. The chemicals were wet and very nasty. And copies could be made only on one side of the special paper. It wouldn’t work for copying money.
8
Once my disappointment wore off, my imagination and resilient nature took over. I cranked off numerous black-and-white copies of both sides of a $ 10 bill, and went to work with colored pencils again. Compared to my previous hand-drawn bill, the finished products looked good to my young eyes. But now came the problem of trying to stick the front and back copies together. No matter what kind of glue I used, the result was the same-a fat 10. I made only 30 or 40 of them and carried them with me for a long time. They never felt right enough to pass, but a couple of times I brought them out while friends were around. I could tell my friends thought the 10s were real, but I knew the copies were just not good enough.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. California
  2. Counterfeit
  3. Bogus
  4. Bill
Noun
Adjective
Adjective
Noun
Place
Modifies a noun

Thing

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, how is the counterfeit bill the author is writing about made?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what made the author aware of the importance of having money?
  3. According to paragraph 3, What did the author use to make his first counterfeit bill?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what did the author not do in order to help him accumulate money?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is imagination.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they would knowingly use a counterfeit $100 bill at a store or movie?
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  correct the following sentence using an apostrophe:


  1. They were exotic, sexy machines, machines to fire a boys desire




Article from http://www.dmagazine.com/publications/d-magazine/1981/december/crime-making-money

Sunday, February 22, 2015

How Gangs Took Over Prisons 1: SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

by Graeme Wood
1
On a clear morning this past February, the inmates in the B Yard of Pelican Bay State Prison filed out of their cellblock a few at a time and let a cool, salty breeze blow across their bodies. Their home, the California prison system’s permanent address for its most hardened gangsters, is in Crescent City, on the edge of a redwood forest—about four miles from the Pacific Ocean in one direction and 20 miles from the Oregon border in the other. This is their yard time.
2
Most of the inmates belong to one of California’s six main prison gangs: Nuestra Familia, the Mexican Mafia, the Aryan Brotherhood, the Black Guerrilla Family, the Northern Structure, or the Nazi Lowriders (the last two are offshoots of Nuestra Familia and the Aryan Brotherhood, respectively). The inmates interact like volatile chemicals: if you open their cells in such a way as to put, say, a lone member of Nuestra Familia in a crowd of Mexican Mafia, the mix can explode violently. So the guards release them in a careful order.
3
“Now watch what they do,” says Christopher Acosta, a corrections officer with a shaved head who worked for 15 years as a front-line prison guard and now runs public relations for Pelican Bay. We are standing with our backs to a fence and can see everything.
4
At first, we seem to be watching a sullen but semi-random parade of terrifying men—heavily tattooed murderers, thieves, and drug dealers walking past one of five casual but alert guards. Some inmates, chosen for a strip search, drop their prison blues into little piles and then spin around, bare-assed, to be scrutinized. Once inspected, they dress and walk out into the yard to fill their lungs with oxygen after a long night in the stagnant air of the cellblock. The first Hispanic inmate to put his clothes on walks about 50 yards to a concrete picnic table, sits down, and waits. The first black inmate goes to a small workout area and stares out at the yard intently. A white guy walks directly to a third spot, closer to the basketball court. Another Hispanic claims another picnic table. Slowly it becomes obvious that they have been moving tactically: each has staked out a rallying point for his group and its affiliates.
5
Once each gang has achieved a critical mass—about five men—it sends off a pair of scouts. Two of the Hispanics at the original concrete picnic table begin a long, winding stroll. “They’ll walk around, get within earshot of the other groups, and try to figure out what’s going down on the yard,” Acosta says. “Then they can come back to their base and say who’s going to attack who, who’s selling what.”
6
Eventually, about 50 inmates are in the yard, and the guards have stepped back and congregated at their own rallying point, backs to the fence, with Acosta. The men’s movements around the yard are so smooth and organized, they seem coordinated by invisible traffic lights. And that’s a good thing. “There’s like 30 knives out there right now,” Acosta says. “Hidden up their rectums.”
7
Understanding how prison gangs work is difficult: they conceal their activities and kill defectors who reveal their practices. This past summer, however, a 32-year-old academic named David Skarbek published The Social Order of the Underworld, his first book, which is the best attempt in a long while to explain the intricate organizational systems that make the gangs so formidable. His focus is the California prison system, which houses the second-largest inmate population in the country—about 135,600 people, slightly more than the population of Bellevue, Washington, split into facilities of a few thousand inmates apiece. With the possible exception of North Korea, the United States has a higher incarceration rate than any other nation, at one in 108 adults. (The national rate rose for 30 years before peaking, in 2008, at one in 99. Less crime and softer punishment for nonviolent crimes have caused the rate to decline since then.)
8
Skarbek’s primary claim is that the underlying order in California prisons comes from precisely what most of us would assume is the source of disorder: the major gangs, which are responsible for the vast majority of the trade in drugs and other contraband, including cellphones, behind bars. “Prison gangs end up providing governance in a brutal but effective way,” he says. “They impose responsibility on everyone, and in some ways the prisons run more smoothly because of them.” The gangs have business out on the streets, too, but their principal activity and authority resides in prisons, where other gangs are the main powers keeping them in check.
9
Skarbek is a native Californian and a lecturer in political economy at King’s College London. When I met him, on a sunny day on the Strand, in London, he was craving a taste of home. He suggested cheeseburgers and beer, which made our lunch American not only in topic of conversation but also in caloric consumption. Prison gangs do not exist in the United Kingdom, at least not with anything like the sophistication or reach of those in California or Texas, and in that respect Skarbek is like a botanist who studies desert wildflowers at a university in Norway.

http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/09/how-gangs-took-over-prisons/379330/

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Inmates
  2. Salty
  3. Breeze
Noun
Adjective
Noun

Person
Modifies a noun
Thing


LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, what do you think ‘yard time’ refers to?
  2. According to paragraph 2, why are the prisoners released in ‘careful order’ ?
  3. According to paragraph 4, why are the prisoners eager to breathe the outside air?
  4. According to paragraph 7, why is it difficult to understand how prison gangs work?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is decline.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.


Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask you partner if they agree that gangs are allowed to police themselves in prison, like what it states in the article. 
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7?  Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using an apostrophe
The second sentence contains a word using an apostrophe.  Write down the word, and write down if the apostrophe is there for a contraction, singular possessive, or plural possessive.


Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Career Spotlight – LEGO : SUP 401 Locate important details in passages {Common Core CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1}

1
How would you like to play with LEGO all day? To children and adults alike, a pile of LEGO offers such possibilities—whole worlds and inhabitants in that familiar tableau of right-angles and vibrant mismatched colors. And then some people take their LEGO a little more seriously.  When scaled up, the bricks allow for exquisite and complex constructions, becoming exact pixels in large structures. It's a huge undertaking to construct those large-scale models that you see in places like LEGOLAND. What's it like to actually spend your days knee-deep in LEGO? We spoke with Adora Lo about her work as a LEGO model designer and how she ended up working in the medium of plastic bricks.
2
Tell us a little about yourself and your experience:
My name is Adora, and I'm a Model Designer and Team Lead at Merlin Studios Carlsbad, based out of LEGOLAND California Resort. I design new architectural and sculptural models for LEGOLAND and LEGOLAND Discovery Center attractions worldwide. I also manage a team of nine model builders, taking care of any issues they may have. I've been working here for almost five years, although I only became a designer and team lead in the last year and a half. I was a Model Builder before that.
3
What drove you to choose your career path?
My graduation coincided with a harsh job market in 2009, so I worked part-time jobs while looking for full time architectural work. While searching for architectural jobs, I found a posting for a LEGO model builder and decided to give it a shot. I didn't make it in the first round, but I got an email a while later asking me to interview again. I got the position after that. I thought I would only be a model builder for a year or two and go back to architecture, but after the first year, I enjoyed it so much that I decided to stay.
4
What kind of education and experience did you need?
In our model shop, there are people from all different backgrounds. There are people straight out of high school and people with graphic arts or public policy degrees. I have a Masters of Architecture from UCLA, and a B.A. in Architecture from UC Berkeley, so the architectural training I received gave me a strong structural building background and a step up in learning all the software that I needed to know for this job. It was also good that I love solving problems, and I can handle stress pretty well. My previous job was as an after­ school teacher, dealing with 20 fifth graders everyday who didn't want to be there.
5
What kinds of things do you do beyond what people see? What do you actually spend the majority of your time doing?
What most people see are the finished models in one of the LEGOLAND parks. Our model shop is offsite and the public never gets to see what goes on inside, mostly because we're working on models for parks and attractions months or years in advance. I spend a lot of time on the computer, using LEGO's proprietary software and Rhino3D to create scaled down buildings or sculptural models. I also build prototypes to figure out how a model will come together, since there are construction techniques that are easier to visualize and test by physically building a model. I'm also a Team Lead, so I hand out projects to my builders, quality check their work, and facilitate other administrative needs. I think something that the public will never see is me or my co-­team lead trying to break LEGO models to test them for durability.
6
What misconceptions do people often have about your job?
I think a lot of people think I just play with LEGO all day, when in fact it's a lot of math and puzzles. One of the first things we memorize is the size of a 1x1 LEGO plate (8mm x 8mm x 3.2mm). If you consider that turning five plates onto their side is equal to two studs in width, and then do that over the course of a 100 stud building with various patterns mixed in, the math starts to get a little intense. Also people tend to think I work for The LEGO Group, which I do not. I work for Merlin Entertainments, which is a British­-based attractions company that owns the LEGOLAND resorts around the world, along with Madam Tussauds and The Dungeons, amongst other attractions.
7
What are your average work hours?
I average 40 hours a week, although I usually work nine hours a day for nine weekdays, then take the 10th day off.

Part 1: Fill in the chart with:
Noun: Person, Place, Thing, or Idea
Verb: Shows Action
Adjective: Modifies a Noun
Article: Refers to a Noun (remember, only “THE”,” An”,” A” are articles)

Word
Part of Speech
Noun, Verb, Article
What does it do? (Person, place, thing, idea) Or (Shows Action)
  1. Inhabitants
  2. Mismatched
  3. Colors
Noun
Adjective
Person
Modifies a noun

LITERACY FOCUS
Part 2:  Stretch Question-Celebrate Writing

  1. According to paragraph 1, some people spend their time ‘knee-deep’ in Lego.  What do you think this means?
  2. According to paragraph 2, what does Adora do at work?
  3. According to paragraph 3, why did Adora stay working with Lego bricks when she wanted to be an architect?
  4. According to paragraph 5, what 3 things does Adora do being a team lead?
  5. Create a question based on the above information that you your classmates can answer to deepen their understanding.
  6. The transferable vocabulary word is construct.  What does this word mean? Explain how the transferable vocabulary can be used in another subject? Use a SEMANTIC WORD MAP for this word.

Part 3: Work With a Partner

  1. Ask your partner if they have any experience playing or building with Lego bricks.  What did they build?  Did they enjoy it?  If they have not, ask them why.
  2. Do you agree with what your partner said in question 7? Or do you have similar experiences? Use the outline on the board for this question and answer.  This question is worth more than all the others.  Take your time writing your answer.
  3. Working with your partner, what do you think is the main idea of this article? Cite a line from the text to support why you think this is the main idea.

EPAS Skill for next exam:  Using a colon to introduce a series (list) of items.

  1. Adora, a team leader, does the following at work:


Article taken from
http://lifehacker.com/career-spotlight-what-i-do-as-a-lego-model-designer-1686123935